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The New Arrows of Indra Q&A Thread

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Molotov:
Ok, what the heck - I'll ask, since the stamp & SASE are free, and the time for response is so small ("Old School - you've come a long way, baby!").

Ahem: the question(s):

Maybe obvious, but for the sake of exploring the topic, can Yogis use magical mala, staves, robes and bowls? Presumably yes - the book notes that Yogis may change their items for another. The section on magical mala notes the use of mala in general (again) by Yogis (among others). And of course, there are example magical staves and mala in AoI.

My GM brain says yes, to the extent that the item in question doesn't otherwise a Yogi's lifestyle (i.e., using a magical power to harm an innocent, for instance).

Molotov:
I appreciate the Arrows of Indra is self-contained, pretty easily digestible, and requires "no anthropology, history, theology or linguistics degree". ;)

Might you suggest some follow-up readings for GMs so interested? The introduction of course recommends reading Indian myth outside the book (for those so interested, but not require) … but it's been … let's call it 2 decades … since I personally studied the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita - so I'm a little disconnected from the source myth.

I'd love any recommendations you might have, as the author.

Many thanks!

Molotov:
O' Great Swami,

Another question (or prompt, perhaps). I've read the the Gods and Religion chapter of Arrows of Indra (and groked it, I believe).

I've also read the AoI articles "How to Play a Bharata Kingdoms Indian",   "The Importance of Family in Old-School Play", and "Presenting the Familiar", among others. All good stuff.

I think the article on playing a Bharata Kingdoms human is especially insightful re: religion and caste, but in some ways, just scratches at the surface (and no disrespect intended here) - I'm thinking, at the moment, of the likes of old school RuneQuest with their cult descriptions.

While not looking to duplicate those or necessarily have that level of detail (where's my 9 page write-up of the cult of Shiva the Destroyer, darn it! ;) ), I am wondering about additional details for the Bharata religions … such as additional trappings on Vaishnavite practices vs. Shaivite practices, etc.

I don't think this is any particular lack in terms of Arrows of Indra completeness, so not a criticism. I'm just looking for any additional insights to bring the players to encourage their specific role-play and provide a little more verisimilitude re: the Kingdoms.

I'm also open to responses of "Yep, make it up - keep a page in your notebook and jot down the times that PC1 says he uses x incense for y rite, that there is a Shiva vengeance spirt, or whatever comes up in play…"

Many thanks!

RPGPundit:

--- Quote from: Molotov;739710 ---

Maybe obvious, but for the sake of exploring the topic, can Yogis use magical mala, staves, robes and bowls? Presumably yes - the book notes that Yogis may change their items for another. The section on magical mala notes the use of mala in general (again) by Yogis (among others). And of course, there are example magical staves and mala in AoI.
--- End quote ---


A: Yes. A yogi can use any magical mala, staves, robes or bowls, within any other regular limits of their class.

RPGPundit:

--- Quote from: Molotov;740813 ---I appreciate the Arrows of Indra is self-contained, pretty easily digestible, and requires "no anthropology, history, theology or linguistics degree". ;)

Might you suggest some follow-up readings for GMs so interested? The introduction of course recommends reading Indian myth outside the book (for those so interested, but not require) … but it's been … let's call it 2 decades … since I personally studied the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita - so I'm a little disconnected from the source myth.

I'd love any recommendations you might have, as the author.

Many thanks!
--- End quote ---


A: Well, its hard for me to give out any specific recommendations, particularly since I don't want to end up sounding too much like saying that added research is essential.  There are a number of good (condensed) versions of the Mahabharata, and also the Ramayana out there these days, including in Comic book format if you're very lazy; plus a couple of amusing TV/cinematic versions.
The Bhagavad Gita, Upanishads, Bhagavata Purana, etc. are available in a number of good modern translations (hint: I would generally stay away from the ISKCON/'Hare Krishna' versions, which I don't think are very good).  But these are all mystical texts, of them only the latter contains actual mythology.

I would recommend that you do some google searches for each of those. You can find the Mahabharata for free here.  Other important texts for free here.

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