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Author Topic: Status of 2020 election fraud  (Read 5930 times)

jhkim

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Re: Status of 2020 election fraud
« Reply #120 on: September 28, 2022, 08:57:00 PM »
My experience?  Camden and Newark, NJ. Philadelphia. Miami. San Diego, LA, Honolulu.

Wow. You've moved around a lot. Can you say more about what you've seen from your experience in those places? How did you interact with the poll workers and local government?

I've seen voters intimidated by Black Panthers. I've seen blatant campaigning by Dems (involving passing out cash to voters) outside polling places go unchallenged by poll workers (who have called the police on Republican and 3rd Party candidates and their supporters wearing "[Candidate] for [Office]" shirts showing up to vote. I've seen poll workers receive duffel bags of ballots.

It's not just limited to voting. *Every* aspect of Dem-machine cities is a lawless hellscape.  Do-gooder liberals in gated communities have zero idea of how these places actually operate vs. how they envision them operating.

Just to check here - are you saying you've seen intimidating Black Panthers in person at your polling place when you went to vote? Or that you've seen video of an incident like the 2008 case in Philadelphia that made national news?

As far as I can tell, the New Black Panther Party are the equivalent of the Westboro Baptist Church. They're an openly anti-semitic, listed as a hate group by the ADL and SPLC, and condemned by nearly everyone on the left except those who don't know who they are. They are despicable, but they aren't representative in the slightest of broader black communities. I don't live in a high poverty area, but I stay involved on many fronts. I've been involved in outreach to East Palo Alto - which has had very high poverty. I have a personal friend involved in Hip Hop National Congress who was invited to speak at a local Black Lives Matter protest.

I'd really want to hear more about how you know about the scene in these places. I'm sure the scene in Philadelphia is quite different than Redwood City or even East Palo Alto. But I'd want to hear more details about personal experiences to understand.


I've live in Redwood City for two decades which is very Democrat-leaning, and have been involved with local government in the sense of speaking at town meetings, PTA and education fund orgs, and some other advocacy through my church. I've recognized some people I know as poll workers although I haven't worked as a poll worker myself. I haven't seen anything to indicate that the people I know are criminals, or that they'd knowingly work with criminals.
I don't know about Redwood City (grew up in Foster City) but in North County San Diego they don't check ID. The poll watchers could be honest as the day is long and it wouldn't matter as anybody could say a name and drop off a ballot and nobody would know unless they ended up with two from the same name.

That's an issue of state law which was discussed before. Anyone could say any name and impersonate another voter - but if they say a name of a random registered voter, it's overwhelmingly likely that this will be detected as a duplicate vote. In 2020, about 95% of registered voters turned up to vote nationwide. (Though only around 70% of eligible voters registered.) In practice, two votes for a single registration are very rare - only a handful per state. I saw a study that found were 3 cases in Florida in 2020, for example.

A potentially more common case is duplicate registration - like when a single person who moves votes in both their original state and their new state. There was a GAI study that found there could be several thousand of these in the U.S. - but that's less than 0.01%, and it isn't necessarily caught by voter ID, since they could have IDs for their old state and new state.

I discussed voter notification as an easy way to detect impersonation. The voters could send a followup (via mail or optional text message) to every voter who voted about when and where they voted.

3catcircus

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Re: Status of 2020 election fraud
« Reply #121 on: September 29, 2022, 10:31:54 AM »
My experience?  Camden and Newark, NJ. Philadelphia. Miami. San Diego, LA, Honolulu.

Wow. You've moved around a lot. Can you say more about what you've seen from your experience in those places? How did you interact with the poll workers and local government?

I've seen voters intimidated by Black Panthers. I've seen blatant campaigning by Dems (involving passing out cash to voters) outside polling places go unchallenged by poll workers (who have called the police on Republican and 3rd Party candidates and their supporters wearing "[Candidate] for [Office]" shirts showing up to vote. I've seen poll workers receive duffel bags of ballots.

It's not just limited to voting. *Every* aspect of Dem-machine cities is a lawless hellscape.  Do-gooder liberals in gated communities have zero idea of how these places actually operate vs. how they envision them operating.

Just to check here - are you saying you've seen intimidating Black Panthers in person at your polling place when you went to vote? Or that you've seen video of an incident like the 2008 case in Philadelphia that made national news?

As far as I can tell, the New Black Panther Party are the equivalent of the Westboro Baptist Church. They're an openly anti-semitic, listed as a hate group by the ADL and SPLC, and condemned by nearly everyone on the left except those who don't know who they are. They are despicable, but they aren't representative in the slightest of broader black communities. I don't live in a high poverty area, but I stay involved on many fronts. I've been involved in outreach to East Palo Alto - which has had very high poverty. I have a personal friend involved in Hip Hop National Congress who was invited to speak at a local Black Lives Matter protest.

I'd really want to hear more about how you know about the scene in these places. I'm sure the scene in Philadelphia is quite different than Redwood City or even East Palo Alto. But I'd want to hear more details about personal experiences to understand.


I've live in Redwood City for two decades which is very Democrat-leaning, and have been involved with local government in the sense of speaking at town meetings, PTA and education fund orgs, and some other advocacy through my church. I've recognized some people I know as poll workers although I haven't worked as a poll worker myself. I haven't seen anything to indicate that the people I know are criminals, or that they'd knowingly work with criminals.
I don't know about Redwood City (grew up in Foster City) but in North County San Diego they don't check ID. The poll watchers could be honest as the day is long and it wouldn't matter as anybody could say a name and drop off a ballot and nobody would know unless they ended up with two from the same name.

That's an issue of state law which was discussed before. Anyone could say any name and impersonate another voter - but if they say a name of a random registered voter, it's overwhelmingly likely that this will be detected as a duplicate vote. In 2020, about 95% of registered voters turned up to vote nationwide. (Though only around 70% of eligible voters registered.) In practice, two votes for a single registration are very rare - only a handful per state. I saw a study that found were 3 cases in Florida in 2020, for example.

A potentially more common case is duplicate registration - like when a single person who moves votes in both their original state and their new state. There was a GAI study that found there could be several thousand of these in the U.S. - but that's less than 0.01%, and it isn't necessarily caught by voter ID, since they could have IDs for their old state and new state.

I discussed voter notification as an easy way to detect impersonation. The voters could send a followup (via mail or optional text message) to every voter who voted about when and where they voted.

I was driving through Philly when I watched the police come and talk to them and make one of them leave (the one holding a nightstick).  The fact that they let others stay is a problem.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2022, 06:48:36 PM by 3catcircus »

KindaMeh

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Re: Status of 2020 election fraud
« Reply #122 on: September 29, 2022, 05:47:37 PM »
I'm sorry to hear that the Black Panthers are a problem to the point where not only that would happen but even the ADL and SPLC would have to recognize them as a hate group. That said, I don't really love the more radical elements who use BLM as cover either, nor do I support a lot of the violence and damage affiliated with that particular group. A group which while possessed of many wonderful members with pure intentions I have no doubt (I even know some), is also based on a lot of statistical manipulation and sketchiness, with a deeper look yielding I would argue somewhat contradictory findings to their claims of nationalized corruption and lethal gun violence specifically across racial lines within the ranks of the police we rely on to defend our nation from crime and corruption and whom many within said movement now wish to defund rather than support and reform in such localities and specific instances as the latter is required.

That said, voter intimidation does go both ways, and I have heard of folks on the right or alt-right, or not-the-right-but-racist doing it too, sometimes even based directly off of race, or sometimes just inadvertently or whatever. So I won't say it's just the prior folks mentioned, though it definitely oftentimes is them.

jhkim's duplicate vote thing is somewhat convincing, I'll admit. I think the 95% of registered voters voting thing is a little fishy from my perspective, but it sounds like at least we could detect duplicate votes pretty well, and that this puts a damper on many fraud types. Which does indeed help catch and prevent fraud. Still behind national voter ID and interstate coordination to prevent things like duplicate voting registration, patch state voting loopholes and restore faith. Also behind voter notifications and possibly also/alternatively election specific private voter keys that work sometime after count and let you and only you check your vote or whatever. But it does ease some of my fears regarding widespread fraud.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2022, 06:21:54 PM by KindaMeh »