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Author Topic: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.  (Read 149917 times)

3catcircus

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3690 on: January 13, 2022, 10:48:39 AM »
  Have Covid now.  I do not want to be insensitive, but if this is the virus that is stopping the world in its tracks....we are all a bunch of pussies.  EXTREMELY mild.
The "Covid now" variant is considerably milder overall than the version we had this past summer. I saw a lot of very sick patients during the Delta surge. Now, not so much, but hot damn does every fool that wakes up with a headache want to be tested over and over again.

Mass formation psychosis in action.

I was vaccinated. Five months later I got Delta. It was like a bad head cold with some O2 debt (like you're in the mountains). They get me mAb treatment and I improved within a day. Got a booster. Got Omicron ( sniffles for a day).

Whose to say whether the vax kept me out of hospital given that it was 5 months after being "fully vaxed" when we have evidence that the VE drops off after 3-4 months, or if the Delta wasn't that bad for most people to begin with.
I don't know about "most people" but Delta filled our system (EDs and inpatient) with patients experiencing significant respiratory distress along with some deaths, so it was plenty bad enough.

It was so bad that you never caught it?

Even with the Hospitals so full the ICUs were at 97% capacity?
Our ICU was running at almost 150% capacity during the Delta surge. It had expanded to the neighboring surgical floor which had surrendered half its beds to them (elective surgeries were on hold, so less need for surgical recovery) which were then staffed largely with travelers.

And no, I didn't catch it. What part of that resulted from natural constitution, vaccination, PPE use, and general precautions is impossible to say.

Was it at 150% because of the number of patients, or was it at 150% because they fired unvaccinated employees resulting in the inability to staff all of their available beds?  This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...
I'm in Florida.  Nurses and staff were not being fired for their vaccination status during Delta, nor for the most part now. 

The ICU was expanded from 40 staffed beds to 60 staffed beds with almost half coming from travelers. I can trust what I did see with my own eyes.

Your last bit is some weird thinking. Most travel agencies require vaccination in their employees because it's far easier for hospitals to demand it from them through short term contracts than to try to push vaccination on their own existing permanent employees.

It has to do with number of employees and the (unlawful) Biden mandate.  As an independent contractor, you're not an employee, so in states that haven't banned vaccine mandates, it is lucrative work.

I'm sure that plenty of staff were out sick with COVID - but omicron is essentially no more dangerous than a typical cold for most people. I'm sure that lots of people, brainwashed for the last two years, overwhelmed hospitals and urgent care centers looking for tests even though they are not showing any signs of illness (other than mental illness).

At *no* points in our past have we ever demanded that people who are not showing signs of any illness to go and get themselves tested for illness. Gov Desantis recently stated as much and the mentally ill pundits started with the whataboutism referring to cancer screenings, neglecting to understand that cancer screenings are performed based upon risk factors (hey, you're 50, get your prostate tickled), as part of routine annual blood work (this number is a little high, let's investigate further), or in response to potential symptoms (I've got this lump on my balls, Doc...) We don't have doctor's handing out cancer screenings like Oprah hands out cars...
« Last Edit: January 13, 2022, 10:50:47 AM by 3catcircus »

jhkim

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3691 on: January 13, 2022, 03:08:38 PM »
This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...

When you say "we" here, 3catcircus, do you also work in health care and saw this yourself? If so, where do you work? If not, what is your source?

I don't doubt that dumb shit has happened. The question is what is the norm? I don't have first-hand knowledge, but people I know in health care seem to think it's roughly real. I'll buy that mainstream liberal-leaning media is biased, but even if I'm reading on Newsmax, I see stuff about hospitals being overwhelmed by the Omicron surge.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/covid-omicron-hospital/2022/01/07/id/1051414/


Ratman_tf

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3692 on: January 13, 2022, 03:15:07 PM »
Its been two years of covid mania. If hospitals haven't prepared for covid spikes it's on them.
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rgalex

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3693 on: January 13, 2022, 03:48:29 PM »
US Supreme Court just blocked the OSHA mandate (6-3) but upheld the CMS one (5-4).

3catcircus

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3694 on: January 13, 2022, 04:22:22 PM »
This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...

When you say "we" here, 3catcircus, do you also work in health care and saw this yourself? If so, where do you work? If not, what is your source?

I don't doubt that dumb shit has happened. The question is what is the norm? I don't have first-hand knowledge, but people I know in health care seem to think it's roughly real. I'll buy that mainstream liberal-leaning media is biased, but even if I'm reading on Newsmax, I see stuff about hospitals being overwhelmed by the Omicron surge.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/covid-omicron-hospital/2022/01/07/id/1051414/

CNN (lack of staff resulting in inability to use all their beds):

https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/13/health/us-coronavirus-thursday/index.html

Yahoo (sick healthcare workers ordered back to work):

https://news.yahoo.com/hospitals-reeling-california-tells-covid-130036030.html

travelnursing.org (job opps for traveling nurses):

https://www.travelnursing.org/covid-updates-for-travel-nurses-january-5-2022/

CBS News (no vaccine required to be hired as a nurse).

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nebraska-job-ad-nurses-no-vaccination-requirement/

HappyDaze

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3695 on: January 13, 2022, 05:08:21 PM »
This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...

When you say "we" here, 3catcircus, do you also work in health care and saw this yourself? If so, where do you work? If not, what is your source?

I don't doubt that dumb shit has happened. The question is what is the norm? I don't have first-hand knowledge, but people I know in health care seem to think it's roughly real. I'll buy that mainstream liberal-leaning media is biased, but even if I'm reading on Newsmax, I see stuff about hospitals being overwhelmed by the Omicron surge.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/covid-omicron-hospital/2022/01/07/id/1051414/

CNN (lack of staff resulting in inability to use all their beds):

https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/13/health/us-coronavirus-thursday/index.html

Yahoo (sick healthcare workers ordered back to work):

https://news.yahoo.com/hospitals-reeling-california-tells-covid-130036030.html

travelnursing.org (job opps for traveling nurses):

https://www.travelnursing.org/covid-updates-for-travel-nurses-january-5-2022/

CBS News (no vaccine required to be hired as a nurse).

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nebraska-job-ad-nurses-no-vaccination-requirement/
My hospital just opened 3 new floors on a tower, so 120 new inpatient beds. We've been trying to hire staff for the past year and we still only have about 1/3 what we need for the new beds (many new hires we redirected to cover gaps in other units) and even with traveling nurses, we can only staff 2/3 of those beds right now.

Ratman_tf

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3696 on: January 13, 2022, 07:05:42 PM »
US Supreme Court just blocked the OSHA mandate (6-3) but upheld the CMS one (5-4).

Good and not-so-good.

I am beyond done with this covid madness. Everyone involved in this bullshit should be metaphorically run out of town. This has been a disastrous response from day one, and they're intentionally prolonging the stupidity.
The notion of an exclusionary and hostile RPG community is a fever dream of zealots who view all social dynamics through a narrow keyhole of structural oppression.
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3catcircus

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3697 on: January 13, 2022, 08:21:56 PM »
This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...

When you say "we" here, 3catcircus, do you also work in health care and saw this yourself? If so, where do you work? If not, what is your source?

I don't doubt that dumb shit has happened. The question is what is the norm? I don't have first-hand knowledge, but people I know in health care seem to think it's roughly real. I'll buy that mainstream liberal-leaning media is biased, but even if I'm reading on Newsmax, I see stuff about hospitals being overwhelmed by the Omicron surge.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/covid-omicron-hospital/2022/01/07/id/1051414/

CNN (lack of staff resulting in inability to use all their beds):

https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/13/health/us-coronavirus-thursday/index.html

Yahoo (sick healthcare workers ordered back to work):

https://news.yahoo.com/hospitals-reeling-california-tells-covid-130036030.html

travelnursing.org (job opps for traveling nurses):

https://www.travelnursing.org/covid-updates-for-travel-nurses-january-5-2022/

CBS News (no vaccine required to be hired as a nurse).

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nebraska-job-ad-nurses-no-vaccination-requirement/
My hospital just opened 3 new floors on a tower, so 120 new inpatient beds. We've been trying to hire staff for the past year and we still only have about 1/3 what we need for the new beds (many new hires we redirected to cover gaps in other units) and even with traveling nurses, we can only staff 2/3 of those beds right now.

Right. The question is if your hospital will report over capacity if they put more bodies in beds than they have staff for, or only if they start stacking them in hallway gurneys because every other bed in an actual room is full.

Who knows if it is hospital administrators being disengenuous or if the media is (as is typical) not reporting factual information.

HappyDaze

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3698 on: January 14, 2022, 12:04:35 AM »
This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...

When you say "we" here, 3catcircus, do you also work in health care and saw this yourself? If so, where do you work? If not, what is your source?

I don't doubt that dumb shit has happened. The question is what is the norm? I don't have first-hand knowledge, but people I know in health care seem to think it's roughly real. I'll buy that mainstream liberal-leaning media is biased, but even if I'm reading on Newsmax, I see stuff about hospitals being overwhelmed by the Omicron surge.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/covid-omicron-hospital/2022/01/07/id/1051414/

CNN (lack of staff resulting in inability to use all their beds):

https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/13/health/us-coronavirus-thursday/index.html

Yahoo (sick healthcare workers ordered back to work):

https://news.yahoo.com/hospitals-reeling-california-tells-covid-130036030.html

travelnursing.org (job opps for traveling nurses):

https://www.travelnursing.org/covid-updates-for-travel-nurses-january-5-2022/

CBS News (no vaccine required to be hired as a nurse).

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nebraska-job-ad-nurses-no-vaccination-requirement/
My hospital just opened 3 new floors on a tower, so 120 new inpatient beds. We've been trying to hire staff for the past year and we still only have about 1/3 what we need for the new beds (many new hires we redirected to cover gaps in other units) and even with traveling nurses, we can only staff 2/3 of those beds right now.

Right. The question is if your hospital will report over capacity if they put more bodies in beds than they have staff for, or only if they start stacking them in hallway gurneys because every other bed in an actual room is full.

Who knows if it is hospital administrators being disengenuous or if the media is (as is typical) not reporting factual information.
Hospitals don't choose which statistics to report or how they do so, they report them in the format they are told to do so by CMS and other authorities. This might be in terms of licensed beds, operational beds, or staffed beds.

Hallway beds are not an inpatient thing, they exist in the EDs d/t the requirements of EMTALA that no patient seeking emergent care be turned away until it can be determined that they no longer have an emergent condition (or that they never did).

Your "who knows" line is the kind of bullshit that doesn't help at all because it implies that nobody knows. I'm telling you facts from within the system and you're still going with "who knows" kind of shit. I know, and so do many others workign in healthcare.

3catcircus

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3699 on: January 14, 2022, 09:04:37 AM »
This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...

When you say "we" here, 3catcircus, do you also work in health care and saw this yourself? If so, where do you work? If not, what is your source?

I don't doubt that dumb shit has happened. The question is what is the norm? I don't have first-hand knowledge, but people I know in health care seem to think it's roughly real. I'll buy that mainstream liberal-leaning media is biased, but even if I'm reading on Newsmax, I see stuff about hospitals being overwhelmed by the Omicron surge.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/covid-omicron-hospital/2022/01/07/id/1051414/

CNN (lack of staff resulting in inability to use all their beds):

https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/13/health/us-coronavirus-thursday/index.html

Yahoo (sick healthcare workers ordered back to work):

https://news.yahoo.com/hospitals-reeling-california-tells-covid-130036030.html

travelnursing.org (job opps for traveling nurses):

https://www.travelnursing.org/covid-updates-for-travel-nurses-january-5-2022/

CBS News (no vaccine required to be hired as a nurse).

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nebraska-job-ad-nurses-no-vaccination-requirement/
My hospital just opened 3 new floors on a tower, so 120 new inpatient beds. We've been trying to hire staff for the past year and we still only have about 1/3 what we need for the new beds (many new hires we redirected to cover gaps in other units) and even with traveling nurses, we can only staff 2/3 of those beds right now.

Right. The question is if your hospital will report over capacity if they put more bodies in beds than they have staff for, or only if they start stacking them in hallway gurneys because every other bed in an actual room is full.

Who knows if it is hospital administrators being disengenuous or if the media is (as is typical) not reporting factual information.
Hospitals don't choose which statistics to report or how they do so, they report them in the format they are told to do so by CMS and other authorities. This might be in terms of licensed beds, operational beds, or staffed beds.

Hallway beds are not an inpatient thing, they exist in the EDs d/t the requirements of EMTALA that no patient seeking emergent care be turned away until it can be determined that they no longer have an emergent condition (or that they never did).

Your "who knows" line is the kind of bullshit that doesn't help at all because it implies that nobody knows. I'm telling you facts from within the system and you're still going with "who knows" kind of shit. I know, and so do many others workign in healthcare.

If you're not in hospital administration and you don't think they would spin the numbers to fit a narrative, you're a fool.

Here's numbers from HHS... doesn't look like they're in a crisis at all.


Kiero

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3700 on: January 14, 2022, 10:02:15 AM »
This ad nauseum, the elites are so terrified of the 'rona:

Currently running: Tyche's Favourites, a historical ACKS campaign set around Massalia in 300BC.

Our podcast site, In Sanity We Trust Productions.

Ghostmaker

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3701 on: January 14, 2022, 10:08:00 AM »
Was amusing myself by reading TBP's incoherent analysis of the recent SCOTUS decision.

Unsurprisingly, it's neither as good or as bad as people think. It's more of a kick back to the lower courts, but there's a fairly strong indication that if a mandate needs to be issued, it's Congress, not the bureaucracy, that needs to be issuing it.

HappyDaze

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3702 on: January 14, 2022, 10:17:17 AM »
This is what is happening in many places. Let's say they have 100 available beds, but only enough staff for 50 beds.  They can declare (and several have done so) themselves to be over capacity with 51 patients occupying beds. 

This is why you can't trust anything coming from hospital administrators without seeing it for yourself.

We have situations where they've fired unvaccinated nurses and doctors while simultaneously ordering vaccinated but infected ones to come back to work *while still contagious*.  Meanwhile all of those fired nurses and doctors are making 2x, 3x, or more salary by being traveling medical practitioners - either going elsewhere or actually being contracted by the hospital that fired them - as independent contractors, they don't have to be vaccinated because they're not employees...

When you say "we" here, 3catcircus, do you also work in health care and saw this yourself? If so, where do you work? If not, what is your source?

I don't doubt that dumb shit has happened. The question is what is the norm? I don't have first-hand knowledge, but people I know in health care seem to think it's roughly real. I'll buy that mainstream liberal-leaning media is biased, but even if I'm reading on Newsmax, I see stuff about hospitals being overwhelmed by the Omicron surge.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/covid-omicron-hospital/2022/01/07/id/1051414/

CNN (lack of staff resulting in inability to use all their beds):

https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/13/health/us-coronavirus-thursday/index.html

Yahoo (sick healthcare workers ordered back to work):

https://news.yahoo.com/hospitals-reeling-california-tells-covid-130036030.html

travelnursing.org (job opps for traveling nurses):

https://www.travelnursing.org/covid-updates-for-travel-nurses-january-5-2022/

CBS News (no vaccine required to be hired as a nurse).

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nebraska-job-ad-nurses-no-vaccination-requirement/
My hospital just opened 3 new floors on a tower, so 120 new inpatient beds. We've been trying to hire staff for the past year and we still only have about 1/3 what we need for the new beds (many new hires we redirected to cover gaps in other units) and even with traveling nurses, we can only staff 2/3 of those beds right now.

Right. The question is if your hospital will report over capacity if they put more bodies in beds than they have staff for, or only if they start stacking them in hallway gurneys because every other bed in an actual room is full.

Who knows if it is hospital administrators being disengenuous or if the media is (as is typical) not reporting factual information.
Hospitals don't choose which statistics to report or how they do so, they report them in the format they are told to do so by CMS and other authorities. This might be in terms of licensed beds, operational beds, or staffed beds.

Hallway beds are not an inpatient thing, they exist in the EDs d/t the requirements of EMTALA that no patient seeking emergent care be turned away until it can be determined that they no longer have an emergent condition (or that they never did).

Your "who knows" line is the kind of bullshit that doesn't help at all because it implies that nobody knows. I'm telling you facts from within the system and you're still going with "who knows" kind of shit. I know, and so do many others workign in healthcare.

If you're not in hospital administration and you don't think they would spin the numbers to fit a narrative, you're a fool.

Here's numbers from HHS... doesn't look like they're in a crisis at all.
Well, I have been in hospital administration,  and while I'm not at present, I have access to internal stats and know full well how to follow them. The hospitals don't decide how to "spin the numbers," that's the decision of the organizations requesting the data.

What is the point of your screenshots? The current surge isn't impacting inpatient (including ICU) beds nearly as much as its impacting ED access by flooding triage with huge waves of "chaff" (largely asymptomatic individuals demanding testing or individuals with minor symptoms believing they need emergent treatment). I've discussed this in several previous posts over the last few weeks.

3catcircus

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3703 on: January 14, 2022, 10:17:36 AM »
Was amusing myself by reading TBP's incoherent analysis of the recent SCOTUS decision.

Unsurprisingly, it's neither as good or as bad as people think. It's more of a kick back to the lower courts, but there's a fairly strong indication that if a mandate needs to be issued, it's Congress, not the bureaucracy, that needs to be issuing it.

I think one of the key factors in there decision was that Ron Klain admitted that they did the mandate despite knowing it wasn't constitutional... When you know you're doing something wrong and you do it anyway, you deserve to suffer the consequences of your actions...

Ghostmaker

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Re: Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.
« Reply #3704 on: January 14, 2022, 10:22:41 AM »
Was amusing myself by reading TBP's incoherent analysis of the recent SCOTUS decision.

Unsurprisingly, it's neither as good or as bad as people think. It's more of a kick back to the lower courts, but there's a fairly strong indication that if a mandate needs to be issued, it's Congress, not the bureaucracy, that needs to be issuing it.

I think one of the key factors in there decision was that Ron Klain admitted that they did the mandate despite knowing it wasn't constitutional... When you know you're doing something wrong and you do it anyway, you deserve to suffer the consequences of your actions...
Even better, he basically admits to such on Twitter.

You know, there's a reason why security-conscious people are looking at social media more and more askance.