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Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.

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HappyDaze:

--- Quote from: Zirunel;1131851 ---So leaving aside long-term economic effects and sticking to your lane (which I can respect), what are your thoughts on the impact of the "lockdown" or whatever you choose to call it, on treatment of non-covid disease? I know in my jurisdiction ongoing treatment e.g. chemo etc. has continued uninterrupted, but in general, access to non-covid medical care is reduced and for anyone not already involved in a treatment program, there must be some whose conditions have gone undiagnosed, or whose diagnosis or surgery has been delayed (potentially leading to poorer outcomes later on)
--- End quote ---

I can speak generally about my system and specifically about my orthopedic group. Non-emergent and non-critical care for some conditions has been delayed or reduced, but there are multiple efforts to compensate. Telemedicine/telehealth has grown tremendously from the pandemic, and it's far easier to schedule telehealth visits now. For many things that might have otherwise required a primary care or urgent care visit (particularly those that can be fixed with a simple script or two), a few minutes with a smartphone can get you what you need. The other big push has been for an increase in preventative care--you know, getting patients to do what they are supposed to be doing to stay healthy. The focus on washing hands, wearing masks, and not touching faces can be a sort of a trial for some people to see if/how they can adopt the self-discipline necessary for employing measures to prevent (or, failing that, control) other conditions. Unfortunately, many of them really lack any self-discipline.

Sorry, dinner calls. More later.

oggsmash:
According to the media, Covid is canceled now right?  Once riots were on the menu it seems concerns for the virus went poof.  I think we are going to have serious economic consequences from our lockdown, as well as small business that do survive now have some repairs to pay for.   Stack that with what I would expect to see a huge surge in cases if the media had even a modicum of truth to their support of lockdowns.

Zirunel:

--- Quote from: HappyDaze;1131915 ---I can speak generally about my system and specifically about my orthopedic group. Non-emergent and non-critical care for some conditions has been delayed or reduced, but there are multiple efforts to compensate. Telemedicine/telehealth has grown tremendously from the pandemic, and it's far easier to schedule telehealth visits now. For many things that might have otherwise required a primary care or urgent care visit (particularly those that can be fixed with a simple script or two), a few minutes with a smartphone can get you what you need. The other big push has been for an increase in preventative care--you know, getting patients to do what they are supposed to be doing to stay healthy. The focus on washing hands, wearing masks, and not touching faces can be a sort of a trial for some people to see if/how they can adopt the self-discipline necessary for employing measures to prevent (or, failing that, control) other conditions. Unfortunately, many of them really lack any self-discipline.

Sorry, dinner calls. More later.
--- End quote ---

Thanks for this. Yes wrt primary care, that has been my experience. Faster and more convenient to access than ever, as long as things can be dealt with virtually. I like that a lot, and I hope that is a lasting legacy of this pandemic. In-person visits and gp-ordered tests do still exist, though they have been truncated. Not sure how hard they are to get, it hasn't come up.

And Emergency is way quiet now. And fast, faster than ever. That's one rapid way to get diagnosis for more serious conditions and access to specialist care.

It's not like non-Covid medicine doesn't exist, in some ways it seems more streamlined now, but I still can't help wondering how many chronic, slowly emerging conditions are slipping between the cracks.

EDITED TO ADD: where I am, hospital resources have been carefully marshalled in anticipation of an overwhelming surge. The overwhelming surge never happened, and our curve is flat now. Covid never did overwhelm capacity, so things are already going back to normal. That may or may not mean the marshalling was never necessary or that it was an overreaction. Or that it won't be necessary in the future. We certainly had case clusters and death clusters. I honestly don't know. There's going to be a whole lot of Monday-morning quarterbacking over this.

DocJones:

--- Quote from: oggsmash;1131988 ---According to the media, Covid is canceled now right?  Once riots were on the menu it seems concerns for the virus went poof.  I think we are going to have serious economic consequences from our lockdown, as well as small business that do survive now have some repairs to pay for.   Stack that with what I would expect to see a huge surge in cases if the media had even a modicum of truth to their support of lockdowns.
--- End quote ---


Just three weeks ago the media was in horror at the audacity of protestors of the 'lockdown'.  Telling us how irresponsible these protestors were and how thousands would be infected and die because of their selfishness.  Some of these protestors in various States were even armed with rifles,  and yet no windows were broken, no businesses were looted, and no buildings were burned.

Would it be a crazy conspiracy theory to suggest that the some on the left were so upset that businesses are reopening and the economy might recover, that they are behind the destruction as a way to get more favorable election returns?

Zirunel:

--- Quote from: DocJones;1132214 ---Would it be a crazy conspiracy theory to suggest that the some on the left were so upset that businesses are reopening and the economy might recover, that they are behind the destruction as a way to get more favorable election returns?
--- End quote ---

Yes, I believe that would be a crazy conspiracy theory.

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