Forum > The RPGPundit's Own Forum

Covid, the "lockdowns" etc.

<< < (649/753) > >>

jhkim:

--- Quote from: Pat on December 03, 2021, 12:41:16 PM ---
--- Quote from: jhkim on December 03, 2021, 12:27:02 PM ---I was curious about that since you mentioned. From what I see, the geographic prevalence of typhus is higher in Mexico than the U.S. in general.

--- End quote ---
It was a reference to the tent cities and street defecation so popular, and the ensuring worry about the rise of medieval diseases like typhus. It's like a little corner of the dark ages amidst the stars and sunshine.
--- End quote ---

OK, I see the intent, but evidently Texas has a higher typhus rate than California, despite California having a higher homelessness rate. So it seems like it's off-base as a critique.

Pat:

--- Quote from: jhkim on December 03, 2021, 01:02:42 PM ---
--- Quote from: Pat on December 03, 2021, 12:41:16 PM ---
--- Quote from: jhkim on December 03, 2021, 12:27:02 PM ---I was curious about that since you mentioned. From what I see, the geographic prevalence of typhus is higher in Mexico than the U.S. in general.

--- End quote ---
It was a reference to the tent cities and street defecation so popular, and the ensuring worry about the rise of medieval diseases like typhus. It's like a little corner of the dark ages amidst the stars and sunshine.
--- End quote ---

OK, I see the intent, but evidently Texas has a higher typhus rate than California, despite California having a higher homelessness rate. So it seems like it's off-base as a critique.

--- End quote ---
No, it's not. Do a little more research.

https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/Typhus.aspx

--- Quote ---In the United States, most cases occur in Texas, California, and Hawaii, with an average of about 300 cases every year. In California, flea-borne typhus is considered endemic (always present) in areas of Los Angeles and Orange counties, but sometimes cases are also reported from other parts of California.
--- End quote ---
That's from California's own website. Also, you're confusing overall prevalence in two huge states with the specific public health concerns that were raised about the tent cities, and the worries about the localized spread of diseases that are, for the most part, almost extinct in the US.

jhkim:

--- Quote from: Pat on December 03, 2021, 01:10:41 PM ---
--- Quote from: jhkim on December 03, 2021, 01:02:42 PM ---OK, I see the intent, but evidently Texas has a higher typhus rate than California, despite California having a higher homelessness rate. So it seems like it's off-base as a critique.
--- End quote ---
No, it's not. Do a little more research.

https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/Typhus.aspx

--- Quote ---In the United States, most cases occur in Texas, California, and Hawaii, with an average of about 300 cases every year. In California, flea-borne typhus is considered endemic (always present) in areas of Los Angeles and Orange counties, but sometimes cases are also reported from other parts of California.
--- End quote ---
That's from California's own website. Also, you're confusing overall prevalence in two huge states with the specific public health concerns that were raised about the tent cities, and the worries about the localized spread of diseases that are, for the most part, almost extinct in the US.

--- End quote ---

So putting this together with the Texas health report I mentioned earlier,


--- Quote ---In the United States, Texas reports the highest numbers of flea-borne typhus cases annually. From the 1940s through the early 2000s, highly endemic areas of typhus were limited to the lower Rio Grande Valley and the Coastal Bend area; however in the past 10 years, new areas of endemnicity have emerged in Bexar, Harris, and Travis counties, among others.
--- End quote ---
Source: https://www.dshs.texas.gov/IDCU/disease/murine_typhus/Flea-borne-Typhus.aspx

it seems like typhus is overall almost extinct, but it is still endemic in two counties in California, plus five or more counties in Texas, and likely in some areas of Hawaii.

You also cited bubonic plague, and I did find a map of plague risk areas in the U.S.:


Source: https://patch.com/california/culvercity/where-expect-plague-united-states-2016-study

The concentration areas are in Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado - along with the northern border of California with Oregon and Utah. I do think this suggests we need to do a better job with public health and disease nationally.

Neither of these singles out California, though.

GeekyBugle:

--- Quote from: jhkim on December 03, 2021, 12:27:02 PM ---
--- Quote from: Pat on December 03, 2021, 11:09:06 AM ---
--- Quote from: HappyDaze on December 03, 2021, 10:39:37 AM ---Mexico is a strange place then, because in Florida we still find flu, RSV, and other respiratory viruses along with a number of other respiratory conditions, both acute and chronic.

--- End quote ---
At least you don't have to worry about typhus and bubonic plague, like California and other third world countries.

--- End quote ---

I was curious about that since you mentioned. From what I see, the geographic prevalence of typhus is higher in Mexico than the U.S. in general.


Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epidemiology_of_typhoid_fever
See also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/typhoid-fever

Within the U.S., I don't see a national distribution map - but this is from a current Texas government report:


--- Quote ---In the United States, Texas reports the highest numbers of flea-borne typhus cases annually. From the 1940s through the early 2000s, highly endemic areas of typhus were limited to the lower Rio Grande Valley and the Coastal Bend area; however in the past 10 years, new areas of endemnicity have emerged in Bexar, Harris, and Travis counties, among others.
--- End quote ---
Source: https://www.dshs.texas.gov/IDCU/disease/murine_typhus/Flea-borne-Typhus.aspx

That is in absolute numbers rather than rate, so other states may have a higher rate per population - but it implies the rate is less in California which has a higher population.

--- End quote ---

I might be wrong here but aren't there more than one type of Typhus?

Cuz In México it's something you get from contaminated food/dirty water, etc. That map paints thw whole country the same but cases are concentrated in... You guessed it the poorest communities who have no access to clean water, etc.

While In California all I can find are cases of Flea-Borne Typhus transmited to humans.

On a First world country in it's biggest economy by state, in it's cities.

So comparing that with a shithole country on it's shitiest communities where people live in dirt floor "houses" and have no clean water seems a bit dishonest to me.

Further more, from the second link:


--- Quote ---"Enteric Fever - Typhoid is an acute febrile illness that attacks the gastrointestinal tract caused by the bacteria Salmonella typhi. Without prompt treatment it can cause serious and life-threatening complications. 21.5 million cases are reported annually and it is considered that more than 75% are acquired during the trip. It represents the fifth infectious disease in travelers due to lack of adequate hygiene, it is estimated that there are 1-10 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants worldwide."
--- End quote ---

Sources:

https://old.com.fundacionio.es/2020/06/22/junio-2020-fiebre-tifoidea-en-mexico-destacan-tamaulipas-y-sinaloa/

http://clinicadeviajero.unam.mx/?p=3237

While in California they are talking of a different type of Typhus, source:

http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/acd/vectortyphus.htm

Pat:
That's a 2016 study. The "medieval plague" worries in California only really popped up in the news in the last couple years. And as I've noted a couple times, it was a reference to public health concerns related to the feces and tent cities. That's different from endemism.

Though another report from CA, this one current (2021), shows some troubling trends:
https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/CDPH%20Document%20Library/Flea-borneTyphusCaseCounts.pdf
Part of the spectacular rise since 2008 seems to be related to a change in data collection or recording methods, since they added suspect and probable as well as confirmed cases. But even discounting that, it's still a pretty steep rise until 2018/2019, and then what appears to be an almost complete absence of testing in the covid years. Which is very odd.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version