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Corporate Political Discrimination and Woke Censorship: Systemic Legal Change

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KindaMeh:
Can/Should change to these issues be effected through political, bureaucratic, or grass roots voter initiative means? If so, how to avoid innate problems with the bureaucracy, political system, and the like? How to avoid stepping on legitimate liberties or free market rights while doing so?

oggsmash:

--- Quote from: KindaMeh on June 29, 2022, 11:38:41 AM ---Can/Should change to these issues be effected through political, bureaucratic, or grass roots voter initiative means? If so, how to avoid innate problems with the bureaucracy, political system, and the like? How to avoid stepping on legitimate liberties or free market rights while doing so?

--- End quote ---

  Ever watch Fightclub and how they fixed "corporate" america?  That is probably a good way to get it done.

Shasarak:
Luckily there is no such thing as cancel culture.

jhkim:

--- Quote from: KindaMeh on June 29, 2022, 11:38:41 AM ---Can/Should change to these issues be effected through political, bureaucratic, or grass roots voter initiative means? If so, how to avoid innate problems with the bureaucracy, political system, and the like? How to avoid stepping on legitimate liberties or free market rights while doing so?
--- End quote ---

Most of my left-leaning friends are all on board with limiting corporate power. So I would think the best way to approach this would be through grass-roots bipartisan effort to restrain all corporate power, regardless of whether it is woke or unwoke. Phrased as rights for employees and/or consumers against corporate power, there's potential for bipartisan support.

Democrats have introduced a number of bills to limit tech monopolies, including The American Choice and Innovation Online Act
; The Platform Competition and Opportunity Act of 2021; The Ending Platform Monopolies Act; The Augmenting Compatibility and Competition by Enabling Service Switching (ACCESS) Act of 2021; The Merger Filing Fee Modernization Act of 2021.

On the other hand, there are Republican state laws that narrowly try to force social media companies to host politicians -- notably Florida's SB 7072 and Texas' HB 20. However, those laws run directly afoul of the social media company's First Amendment right to control their own platform. The Texas law was just re-blocked by an unusual majority on the Supreme Court (John Roberts, Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett, Sonia Sotomayor and Stephen Breyer).

I think generally limiting corporate power is bipartisan - but trying to narrowly carve out limits only certain purposes is likely to be more partisan and harder to get support for.

GeekyBugle:

--- Quote from: jhkim on June 29, 2022, 06:18:51 PM ---
--- Quote from: KindaMeh on June 29, 2022, 11:38:41 AM ---Can/Should change to these issues be effected through political, bureaucratic, or grass roots voter initiative means? If so, how to avoid innate problems with the bureaucracy, political system, and the like? How to avoid stepping on legitimate liberties or free market rights while doing so?
--- End quote ---

Most of my left-leaning friends are all on board with limiting corporate power. So I would think the best way to approach this would be through grass-roots bipartisan effort to restrain all corporate power, regardless of whether it is woke or unwoke. Phrased as rights for employees and/or consumers against corporate power, there's potential for bipartisan support.

Democrats have introduced a number of bills to limit tech monopolies, including The American Choice and Innovation Online Act
; The Platform Competition and Opportunity Act of 2021; The Ending Platform Monopolies Act; The Augmenting Compatibility and Competition by Enabling Service Switching (ACCESS) Act of 2021; The Merger Filing Fee Modernization Act of 2021.

On the other hand, there are Republican state laws that narrowly try to force social media companies to host politicians -- notably Florida's SB 7072 and Texas' HB 20. However, those laws run directly afoul of the social media company's First Amendment right to control their own platform. The Texas law was just re-blocked by an unusual majority on the Supreme Court (John Roberts, Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett, Sonia Sotomayor and Stephen Breyer).

I think generally limiting corporate power is bipartisan - but trying to narrowly carve out limits only certain purposes is likely to be more partisan and harder to get support for.

--- End quote ---

And in the process giving even more power to the governments, because the governments have our best interests at heart and would never use those extended powers to fuck over the average Joe right?

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