This is a site for discussing roleplaying games. Have fun doing so, but there is one major rule: do not discuss political issues that aren't directly and uniquely related to the subject of the thread and about gaming. While this site is dedicated to free speech, the following will not be tolerated: devolving a thread into unrelated political discussion, sockpuppeting (using multiple and/or bogus accounts), disrupting topics without contributing to them, and posting images that could get someone fired in the workplace (an external link is OK, but clearly mark it as Not Safe For Work, or NSFW). If you receive a warning, please take it seriously and either move on to another topic or steer the discussion back to its original RPG-related theme.

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10
11
Life of the author where it's not a corporation seems reasonable to me for copyright,
Orphaned copyright products should enter the public domain immediatly.
You can't accomplish both of these goals at once. There's tons of authors who are apathetic and don't care to preserve their own works, and plenty of others who simply don't have the time and know-how to properly preserve their works.

If a corporation hires you to write/develop an IP for them, YOU are the author, and you sold them an exclusive right to the copyright, which is tied to you and will expire when you die.

Now please explain EXACTLY what type of works are we talking about here, because I think you're talking about video games/software alone, since I don't see how else the author has to do something special or technical for the work to be preserved.

So what you want is for the law, if the creator of a software neglects it in your opinion, to strip away HIS property rights and force the author to put the source code in the public domain...

But software is a very different beast, so you want MS Office to be put in the public domain after 20 years... Who in their right mind would develop ANY software? Besides the people already on the FOSS train?

Taking the last question first. The lifetime of a specific software release is much shorter than 20 years. I'm am reasonably sure that over 95% of the profits for any release are in the first five years. To get significant profits after that, you need major updates to the software. If a third party could legally sell Office XP from 20 years ago, they would take roughly zero profits away from Microsoft. As a test of that, we can see that plenty of corporations engage in non-copyrightable technology like inventions, drug development, and genetic tech - which are only protected by patent that lasts for 20 years max.


I don't speak for BoxCrayonTales, but for me, the example I'd want to talk about is tabletop RPGs. I believe that retroclones of old school RPGs from the 1970s and 1980s should be flat-out legal. If someone has an old dog-eared book from a basement and there is a cool mechanic or idea from it, I think they should be able to use it in their new game as-is. There are lots of variants of old games and even complete retro-clones that I consider to be genuinely positive development of the original. The authors shouldn't be considered evil plagiarizers, but rather trying to positively develop the games. To get more specific, I think anyone should be able to create their own version of Star Frontiers, even though the original is still available for sale.
12
Media and Inspiration / What happened to the DNDaDoc film?
« Last post by BronzeDragon on Today at 01:36:56 PM »
There was this kickstarted documentary back in 2012 I think that was supposed to chronicle D&D's history, with interviews of all the major figures still alive at the time and the participation of people like David Ewalt.

Does anybody know what happened to it? It obviously didn't get made, but I see absolutely zero history on what actually went down.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2316782/
13
Personally I hope the current attack/saving throw mechanic stays instead of turning into another BAB system. Having the number you need to roll right there on your character sheet sped things up wonderfully when I was introducing the game to people who'd never played RPGs before. First level character, 10+ to hit AC 0. Easy peasy.

I'm with you. I'm kind of tired of this synergizing of the attack/action roll to become a universal OSR mechanism that's been happening lately in OSR games. Part of what makes ACKS unique is how it handles the action roll.
14
That would be cool. I don’t have the skill set to do it though. I’m okay with pundit pinning this thread if he wants I wonder if there’s an easier way to update the list on the original post. Such a pain with drop down format
15
our gaming group has looked over the new 5.5E changes and decided they are mostly streamling systems across the board to make it simpler for players to pickup a PC and game as well as DM's not having to hunt down what spells monsters can cast and giving them abilities that mimic spells instead.  The feats were changed so you don't need sharpshooter as the most OP feat ever with Crossbow expert to shoot into combat, other "exploitable" tricks of the trade to make it so you WANT To stick with a class from 1-20 instead of dipping into Cleric for Armor feats, Sorcerer for 1 level of arcane parts, etc.

Standaradizing and Streamling.
16
Personally I hope the current attack/saving throw mechanic stays instead of turning into another BAB system. Having the number you need to roll right there on your character sheet sped things up wonderfully when I was introducing the game to people who'd never played RPGs before. First level character, 10+ to hit AC 0. Easy peasy.
17
Life of the author where it's not a corporation seems reasonable to me for copyright,
Orphaned copyright products should enter the public domain immediatly.
You can't accomplish both of these goals at once. There's tons of authors who are apathetic and don't care to preserve their own works, and plenty of others who simply don't have the time and know-how to properly preserve their works.

So, when you say orphaned you don't mean orphaned but neglected.

IF you meant orphaned then you can with an integral overhaul of copyright law, one that isn't made to protect megacorporations while screwing the little guy:

The author is a physical person, it should be defined as such in the law.

If a corporation hires you to write/develop an IP for them, YOU are the author, and you sold them an exclusive right to the copyright, which is tied to you and will expire when you die.

Now please explain EXACTLY what type of works are we talking about here, because I think you're talking about video games/software alone, since I don't see how else the author has to do something special or technical for the work to be preserved.

So what you want is for the law, if the creator of a software neglects it in your opinion, to strip away HIS property rights and force the author to put the source code in the public domain...

But software is a very different beast, so you want MS Office to be put in the public domain after 20 years... Who in their right mind would develop ANY software? Besides the people already on the FOSS train?

This is ideological and doesn't take into account human nature.
18

Here's the paper where I got the 20 years figure from: https://scholarship.law.georgetown.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3300&context=facpub

ANYONE can write a paper justifying their position based on theoretical law and "principles". I don't agree with the 20 years limit.

Why should we allow a megacorporation to just take my book and profit from it?
Long story short: the Burroughs Estate retains control of Tarzan trademark even though the copyright is expired. It's not legal for anybody to release Tarzan-labeled products without the Estate getting royalties.
[/quote]

I can take whatever Tarzan books ARE in the public domain, make a print run as long as I put a different name on the cover, for instance: Edgar Rice Burroughs' Jungle Lord.

Furthermore, ERB IS dead, you're conflating trademark with copyright, those aren't the same thing, and I already said trademark should expire at the same time than copyright.

In my opinion this should be life of the author or, if they die young, a number of years after his death to protect the wife/children from ending destitute.
19
As others have noted, two things that stand out are the variations on racial classes, and the domain rules.

There are several books, though, and I'd love if they put out a single volume class compendium, bringing in all the classes from all the supplements.

On the negative side, they have their own take on armor class, which is a bit off-putting.  It's not hard to learn, but being used to ascending or descending from 10, switching to 0 just seems weird.

Since a given class gets a hit on a specific number (Ftr 1 w/ 16 Str  'hits' on an 8+ on a d20, for example), I up front explained it to my players as AC being thought of as a modifier to the attack roll like any of the situational modifiers. That seemed to really help them when we started using ACKS.

The 2nd edition notes/proposal that was on the Patreon takes that one step further.

Everything is a target of 20. The saving throw and to hit numbers get converted to bonuses to the DC roll as well.

I really like the Target20 mechanic:

http://www.oedgames.com/target20/

I've been using Target 18. Seems to work well for existing STs, skills and even combat.

https://methodsetmadness.blogspot.com/2022/09/minimalist-osr-target-18.html
20
I imagine that 1D&D will be “backwards-compatible” with 5E material, at least in concept, but in practice it will be completely unbalanced to the point of it feeling like they didn’t even bother to play test it.
5E already suffers from Race, Class, and Subclass bloat, and it seems 1D&D is just codifying that and “pushing the splinter deeper”.
One man’s “bloat” is another man’s “necessary features.”

What’s especially annoying about the “bloat” argument is it invariably defines bloat as  “every player option that isn’t the Tolkein Cargo Cult + Moses the Vampire Hunter.”

Not everyone wants to play a LotR fanfic expy.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10