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Recent Posts

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1
It is not enough that the person has a free choice - they must make the right free choice! No, not that one! Choose the other!

The only reason I can think of for this is that the person wants to see more women be warriors. To which I say: many Western armies now allow women in combat roles. So a man who wants to see them can join up, and a woman who wants to see them can join up and become one. Of course, this would require a lot of hard work and discipline.
2
I don't think it's necessary but I think most players want it.

Levels tend to serve two purposes, progression and novelty.

The heroic journey archetype generally involves a character moving from being novice, to undergoing challenges, overcoming them, and coming out stronger. Because the TTRPG hobby has developed a lot of mechanics for all kinds of things, we also generally want a mechanic to express this type of narrative progression.

Levels also allow us to mechanically introduce new aspects to characters. Novelty feels good, and while you could always just run a different character, tying that novelty in to the narrative & mechanical progression amplifies that good feeling even further.
When executed well narratively, you get something like Harry Dresden's arc over 3-4 novels. And mechanically if you're running a crunchier game system (D&D3+) it's fun to see how your new power influences what you can do on the battlefield.
3
I took it as a careless use of the word. Maybe she thinks she does have an example of Tolkien "demonizing" women. I can't think of one.

One of the earliest examples of wokeism (already heard before the movies) is the condemnation of Tolkien as "patriarchal" because when Eowyn can finally freely choose her future she decides to abandon armor and weapons, and to become an healer. "(screech!) And of course at the end she is relegated to the usual female jobs! (/screech!)"

That what Eowyn represents, in a nutshell, is the female battle to get free and freely choose is, obviously, missed. That Aragorn, Faramir and Eomer recognise how her inability to freely act was driving her literally mad doesn't exist in this interpretation of the book. Faramir tells her that she can be what she wants, and that's what Eowyn finally does. But, no, she had to choose a specific thing - that was the only way to be free. No, really ::)

Wasn't it Jordan Peterson (who despite having multiple lectures online on how horrible Hitler was and why fascism is a bad thing is somehow consided alt-right on RPG.net) who pointed out that in the countries with the most egalitarian freedom (i.e the scandinavian countries) women still picked the usual "female jobs" by their own accord?

I believe so.
4
I took it as a careless use of the word. Maybe she thinks she does have an example of Tolkien "demonizing" women. I can't think of one.

One of the earliest examples of wokeism (already heard before the movies) is the condemnation of Tolkien as "patriarchal" because when Eowyn can finally freely choose her future she decides to abandon armor and weapons, and to become an healer. "(screech!) And of course at the end she is relegated to the usual female jobs! (/screech!)"

That what Eowyn represents, in a nutshell, is the female battle to get free and freely choose is, obviously, missed. That Aragorn, Faramir and Eomer recognise how her inability to freely act was driving her literally mad doesn't exist in this interpretation of the book. Faramir tells her that she can be what she wants, and that's what Eowyn finally does. But, no, she had to choose a specific thing - that was the only way to be free. No, really ::)

Wasn't it Jordan Peterson (who despite having multiple lectures online on how horrible Hitler was and why fascism is a bad thing is somehow consided alt-right on RPG.net) who pointed out that in the countries with the most egalitarian freedom (i.e the scandinavian countries) women still picked the usual "female jobs" by their own accord?
5
I took it as a careless use of the word. Maybe she thinks she does have an example of Tolkien "demonizing" women. I can't think of one.

One of the earliest examples of wokeism (already heard before the movies) is the condemnation of Tolkien as "patriarchal" because when Eowyn can finally freely choose her future she decides to abandon armor and weapons, and to become an healer. "(screech!) And of course at the end she is relegated to the usual female jobs! (/screech!)"

That what Eowyn represents, in a nutshell, is the female battle to get free and freely choose is, obviously, missed. That Aragorn, Faramir and Eomer recognise how her inability to freely act was driving her literally mad doesn't exist in this interpretation of the book. Faramir tells her that she can be what she wants, and that's what Eowyn finally does. But, no, she had to choose a specific thing - that was the only way to be free. No, really ::)
6
Anyway, I suspect that even the most woke wokester still wants to be entertained, and something like Game of Thrones was pretty popular. They come up with various excuses-

https://urge.org/its-okay-to-like-problematic-things/

I was thinking "Ah, wow, so we are allowed a little vacation every then and now!" - when I stumbled into this escherian declaration:

"I like “Lord of the Rings,” even though the storyline demonizes women and certain races."

I must admit that imagining Eowyn with horns and red eyes has a certain charm...

Yeah, I have no idea what the author is talking about.
Apart from Eowyn who is a god damn hero there's Arwen who get her own big damn hero moment in the movies that she didnt get in the books.
Galadriel? Did the author not notice that she RESISTS the lure of the ring even if she is tempted, making her no lesser person than Gandalf or Elrond.

The only one left leaves us with Lobelia Sackville-Baggins who was a caricature of a woman Tolkien knew in real life. Who then redeemed herself  in the book in (and after) the scouring of the Shire.

One could argue that there are not enough heroic women compared to the amount of men, but thats not demonizing women.

Also, you can find strong women across all Tolkien's works. Lúthien and Galadriel herself in "The Silmarillion", for example (a lot of people forget about Galadriel's rabble rouser past ;D The "only female to stand tall" during the rebellion of the Noldor).

As always I wonder if the ideas expressed by this woman are genuinely her own or if she is parroting some "manifesto" or stuff. A couple of days ago I found another blog where the author said how "She loved The Dream Quest for the Unknown Kadath until she realised the 'problematic lack of female characters'" (I guess that 'Saving Private Ryan is another big no no'). This is becoming the mental heroin of our times...
7
- I really am not comfortable running rules-as-written the 5e Detect Magic & Identify spells when the world is full of non-standard magic that doesn't necessarily fit into a defined spell from a defined school.

That's come up a couple of times in my games. I have a player that loves using Detect Magic as much as possible. But what, for example, would be the school of magic on a bag of holding?

I've been mostly hand-waving it.
8
Anyway, I suspect that even the most woke wokester still wants to be entertained, and something like Game of Thrones was pretty popular. They come up with various excuses-

https://urge.org/its-okay-to-like-problematic-things/

I was thinking "Ah, wow, so we are allowed a little vacation every then and now!" - when I stumbled into this escherian declaration:

"I like “Lord of the Rings,” even though the storyline demonizes women and certain races."

I must admit that imagining Eowyn with horns and red eyes has a certain charm...

Yeah, I have no idea what the author is talking about.
Apart from Eowyn who is a god damn hero there's Arwen who get her own big damn hero moment in the movies that she didnt get in the books.

*Grumbles in Tolkien*

Quote
Galadriel? Did the author not notice that she RESISTS the lure of the ring even if she is tempted, making her no lesser person than Gandalf or Elrond.

The only one left leaves us with Lobelia Sackville-Baggins who was a caricature of a woman Tolkien knew in real life. Who then redeemed herself  in the book in (and after) the scouring of the Shire.

One could argue that there are not enough heroic women compared to the amount of men, but thats not demonizing women.

I took it as a careless use of the word. Maybe she thinks she does have an example of Tolkien "demonizing" women. I can't think of one.
9
Anyway, I suspect that even the most woke wokester still wants to be entertained, and something like Game of Thrones was pretty popular. They come up with various excuses-

https://urge.org/its-okay-to-like-problematic-things/

I was thinking "Ah, wow, so we are allowed a little vacation every then and now!" - when I stumbled into this escherian declaration:

"I like “Lord of the Rings,” even though the storyline demonizes women and certain races."

I must admit that imagining Eowyn with horns and red eyes has a certain charm...

Yeah, I have no idea what the author is talking about.
Apart from Eowyn who is a god damn hero there's Arwen who get her own big damn hero moment in the movies that she didnt get in the books.
Galadriel? Did the author not notice that she RESISTS the lure of the ring even if she is tempted, making her no lesser person than Gandalf or Elrond.

The only one left leaves us with Lobelia Sackville-Baggins who was a caricature of a woman Tolkien knew in real life. Who then redeemed herself  in the book in (and after) the scouring of the Shire.

One could argue that there are not enough heroic women compared to the amount of men, but thats not demonizing women.

10
The book was better. I'm still wondering if John Travolta is a deep cover double agent who was out to screw Scientology by making a terrible adaptation of Battlefield Earth.

Is it better at being a comedy? Does it have cavemen piloting vacuum-packed jets?

A lot of the "science" is pretty funny. The pysclo "breath gas" (Yes) exploded when exposed to uranium rays. Their killer gas weapon was neutralized by exposure to salt .  In one case a mam jumps from one aircraft travelling supersonic speeds to another one supposedl;y because the jets use teleportation drive which means no wind resistance.
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