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Messages - Ian Absentia

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1
Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion / What've I Missed?
« on: August 09, 2010, 11:13:35 PM »
Dude, I thought you were holed up in your bunker in the foothills, waiting for the Obama-nazis to kick down your door and yoke you into slave labor.  What the hell were you doing at GenCon?  A reconnaissance operation?

!i!

2
Quote from: p4nic;398161
I get really annoyed when people that I play with try to make every armed force in the online sci-fi based games I play into the United States Army.
Expand and clarify.  This statement intrigues me.

!i!

3
Quote from: Cylonophile;398013
I'd have told this guy that we're attacking WHEN WE DAMN WELL FEEL LIKE IT and if the guys at the base are supposedly military pros they'd know the best hour for an attack and be expecting it, so we'd catch them by surprise by not attacking at the "doctrinally correct" hour, so there.
Yeah, this story almost belongs in the thread about "What does a GM do when the players don't follow the logical course of action?"  We had a plan that involved attacking in the dead of night, and he stopped the game to lecture us about how the best time is closer to 0300-0400 when sentries are at their most exhausted and lowest guard and blah-blah-blah.  We changed our plans to attack between 0300 and 0400 Hrs.  Is this railroading?
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Also, I;d have began talking to him in the exact tone he talked to me in.
Yeah, but that's just pissing in the pot.  The result of his tone, overweening expertise, and non-character-based GM style was that I never came back to the game.  I'm not sure if anyone else did, either.

!i!

4
Quote from: Novastar;397598
As a Marine Brat, I remember the first Robotech game I played that was filled with non-military personnel: the slap-happy salutes, talking back to a superior officer during the briefing, conduct unbecoming, etc...
And totally in character for Robotech, when you think about it.
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I nearly lost it a dozen times, before realizing I just needed to relax and enjoy the game.
And also in character for Robotech.  Yours would be the uptight flyboy who has to eventually learn to let go before he truly earns his wings.

Good heavens, I love Robotech / Macross.

!i!

5
Quote from: thedungeondelver;397838
If we fire up Twilight:2000, though?  Yeah, step the fuck back, I'm about to have a nerdsplosion.
This is the one game where I (briefly) played with an Army National Guard military-nerd GM.  The guy had no time for characterisation, and ran the game essentially as a tactical sim.  Frankly, I think he would have been better served by running Squad Leader against the T2K backdrop.  Really, though, the worst thing about him was the jeering tone with which he'd point out our every tactical mistake, followed by a lecture on the proper hour of the early morning at which to assault an armed emplacement, or the relatively low stopping power of a shotgun firing a slug load against a target with a kevlar lined flak jacket.

The one thing I will say in his favor -- he described the setting well.  No real roleplaying beyond tactical or strategic movement, but you had a feel for where you were.  I wasn't kidding about him being better off running a game of Squad Leader.

!i!

6
Quote from: Fifth Element;397376
No more so than at the RPG forums I frequent.
Yes, but when viewing the Internet, one can control one's own climate and airflow.

The two shops that I visit from time to time are both decent places, each appealing to a different segment of the gaming population.  I'd describe the more fringe elements of either store as being more in the "Hur-hur-dur" category of social misfit, rather than full-on social retard, and that's all right (or at least no big deal).  On only the rarest occasion will there be the dude who has plopped cross-legged on the floor, blocking access to the shelves, reading a book deeply from cover-to-cover, bleeding off an eye-watering stench of surface tissue decay.  And you know, that guy could just as easily wind up at any of the local used book stores, or computer/console game stores, too.  That scrawny little freak gets around.

!i!

7
Quote from: flyingcircus;397271
...but yeah us Americans are bad folk...
No, we're apparently just a bunch of whimpering cry-babies with delicate sensibilities.

Really, this sort of thing won't wash well here.

!i!

8
Kender.

!i!

9
The old chestnut...

Q: Want to lose 10 lbs of ugly fat fast?
A: Cut off your head.

Hardy-har-har.

!i!

10
Quote from: Werekoala;396590
Ah, but there's that nasty "self control", "personal responsibility" thing again. I'm so heartless. Its easier to let Washington do it.

There's a REASON you can't watch 5 minutes of TV without seeing a pill commercial for something - and its not that everyone is sicker, its that industry WANTS YOU TO THINK you are. And pay up.

[...snip...]

If you don't want them rolling around in swimming-pools full of cash, then how about we all get healthier instead of taking a pill for anything and everything.
And there's the healthcare "crisis" in a nutshell.  Two nutshells, I suppose.  US healthcare has become a consumer industry instead of a humanitarian service.  Throw affordable "wellness" education/health maintenance medical checkups -- the sort of thing your family doctor is supposed to do -- onto that last sentence and I'm totally onboard.

See?  You and I go 'round and 'round on each other enough, we end up agreeing.  That's why I always end up liking you despite our rather polar political views.  And, yes, I mean that.

!i!

11
Quote from: The Butcher;392677
The idea brings to mind another interesting analogy. The Travellers' Aid Society as a stand-in for Freemasonry?
I suggest that you dig up a copy of the old "classic" Trav adventure, Adventure 3: Twilight's Peak.  There was specific mention of The Octagon Society, which I used toward that very end.

!i!

12
Quote from: Werekoala;396584
*clap, clap clap* - you take my very first sentence and twist it to your own ends.
No, I didn't.  It was sitting there, begging for clarification.
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I'm talking about the Wal-Mart crowd (to pick a target you're all comfy with attacking).
No, I'm really not.
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HEALTHCARE is fine. Better than ever. Never has there been more of it, or has it been more available to more people.
For those who can afford it.  The economic bar to entry and availability has been rising far in advance of wages for the last decade.  Even those who can afford it do so at an increasingly disporportionate cost to their personal incomes.  Of course, that cost becomes less disproportionate after a certain wealth threshold, one that I certainly haven't achieved.
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HEALTH is NOT fine, unless you somehow equate inprovements in medicine to an increase in diabetes and the other ailments you mentioned.
I clearly equated those sundry ailments to increased costs in healthcare.  You're leaning on the excluded middle again.
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Three months ago, I was taking seven pills a day for various things. I cut my calories back to 1500 a day (living like royalty, eating like a king - isn't it nice to be rich?) and walk for 10 minutes, three times a day (oh, the luxury of such time, to be able to afford to spend all day exercising!) - I've since dropped almost twenty-five pounds and I'm taking one pill a day (that I probably won't need much longer).
So you were receiving sub-par healthcare that addressed only your symptoms instead of promoting your welfare.  Is this an example of "the best medical care in the world" that I hear about so often?  Do you think you would have received better care and advice if you'd been more affluent?  Lucky you that you're so strong-headed, smart, and disciplined -- and I mean that -- because not being wealthy enough to afford real quality healthcare wasn't doing you any favors.

You actually help make my point, and I'm largely onboard with your disdain for the culture of victimhood.  But, man, it looks like you're giving private industry a pass on the very same complaints you register against big government.  It appears that it's okay to be bloated and incompetent as long as a private interest can profit from it, instead of a bureaucracy frittering its funding away. That's fucked up no matter which way you cut it.

!i!

13
Quote from: Peregrin;396582
Or what about those of us born with diseases which don't come from poor lifestyle but rather genetics, those of us who require expensive, long-term treatments, the type of patients the insurance companies love to drop if they can find even a t you didn't cross on your paperwork.
Hypochondriac whiners, every one of us.  Trust in private industry to do what's best for non-shareholders, because that strategy has a long and illustrious history of success.

!i!

14
Quote from: Werekoala;396570
There is no healthcare crisis.
Systematic rises in type-2 diabetes, respiratory ailments, broad-spectrum allergies, obesity (to which you admit, but don't see as a problem), not to mention exponential increases in the cost of health maintenance costs as a result of corporate leveraging of the catastrophic insurance model.  The "crisis" may not strike you as acute, but can you deny that it's chronic?
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We're living longer, and healthier (despite being huge whales) than at any point in human history.
I've heard this argument before, invariably from people who are both overweight and with adequate health insurance coverage, by some coincidence.  Living longer and healthier lives, yet with a compromised quality of life.  Hooray for progress.
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Imagine how much better we would be IF we were also active and ate well?
And there it is. If you can imagine that, then, yes, that's part and parcel of the chronic "crisis" that you refute.
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Fat, out-of-shape hypochondriacs demanding free healthcare, because how else are they going to maintain their "lifestyle"? How could that possibly go wrong?
Hyperbole and the fallacy of the excluded middle don't suit you.  What about trim, active, health-conscious professionals who demand affordable maintenance healthcare so that they don't have to spend a disproportionate amount of their monthly salaries on supporting a wasteful, profit-driven private industry that is set up to hedge against liability to the very clientele it is intended to serve?

!i!

15
The RPGPundit's Own Forum / These are not your Liberals
« on: July 28, 2010, 05:59:52 PM »
Quote from: Bradford C. Walker;396370
...and be wary of what narratives get pushed.
And be wary of seeking out narratives that confirm your own opinions.

!i!

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