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Messages - Null42

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1
I'm convinced it's the smartphones and social media. Everything stupid you ever said around to torment you, especially with the rules for 'unacceptable' changing so quickly?

(and shuddemell: yup, Giuliani, though from what I've read the cops think he took all the credit for their hard work.)

2
I've been over there a bit.

I'd say yes, it's becoming like that and no, it's not there yet. Check out the infractions thread on RPG.net--they ban people for mocking the Protocols of the Elders of Zion in an insufficiently rabid way, calling Narrangasett an English name (it is in fact not English but Native American, but a ban?), and various other things that read like a parody of tumblr.

I tend to stay out of these discussions on there though, thinking about it, maybe I should push back a little until they ban me. From what I can see they actually allow you to delete your account, unlike RPG.net which refuses to, probably so they can keep everything you said to mine for blackmail material if they can figure out who you really are.

Interestingly, apparently the guy who started the thread, after specifically asking about how to make a more inclusive OSR game, mentioned when asked that he has been pushed out of RPG.net. So Big Purple's hypercensoriousness isn't just political...they've got a severe case of generic love of the banhammer as well. (This does describe most of the woke left as well, BTW.)

3
The RPGPundit's Own Forum / NYT: don't think critically!
« on: February 19, 2021, 09:32:25 PM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/18/opinion/fake-news-media-attention.html

So some of you may be old enough to remember when they taught you to 'question authority' and 'think critically' and the like.

No more! According to the NYT, because people are believing silly things, instead of trying to figure out the truth they should check approved sources and...Wikipedia.

Sometimes I wonder who won the Cold War.

4
Media and Inspiration / Re: Gina Carano fired by Disney.
« on: February 13, 2021, 04:43:44 PM »
Seriously, this is how you fight back: conservatives making their own movies.

5
Other Games / Re: Why D&D SJWs are Attacking Baldur's Gate
« on: February 13, 2021, 04:41:27 PM »
*sigh* Pundit isn't wrong about the whys, but vidya gaems have been under attack from the SJWs and their media for far too long now. Also, IMHO, THE BEST D&D video game of all time is The Pool Of Radiance from SSI released in 1988 Commodore 64 version (first serious attempt at 1E AD&D rules on the computer). Digital OSR: https://www.c64-wiki.com/wiki/Pool_of_Radiance

You've played the ten or so sequels with the same engine and the FRUA fangames?

6
Ya know...it's true though. A lot of times people make mistake X once the new generation wasn't around to see why X was a bad idea.

I'm from New York originally, and from afar I'm watching the city slide back into the same chaos of the 60s-80s. They had this whole 'defund the police' business back in the 60s, except back then they were claiming that law enforcement was useless because you weren't addressing the 'root causes' of crime.

7
Not to bump off Estar, who's welcome to reply when he wants... I played OD&D, 1e and 5e (quite the shift!) and I think I do like the older editions better. The game got a little too easy...you get all your hitpoints back after resting one day? Using hit dice as a free healing ability? Oh well. A spectre comes out of a well and I freak out...turns out you lose maximum HP for a while if it hits you now. They were all rather amused to learn you permanently lost two levels if it hit you back in the day.

Doesn't really matter as long as you're having fun, but for me it feels like a bit more of a superhero game now. Oh well.

8
Media and Inspiration / Re: [NSFW] Metal for Swords & Sorcery fans
« on: February 11, 2021, 09:55:37 PM »
Thank you sir!

It's one song, but 'Black Blade' is a Blue Oyster Cult song about Elric, written by Moorcock himself. The 70s-80s rock band Hawkwind has a whole album about Elric, The Chronicle of the Black Sword.

9
I have my doubts Lovecraft was aware of any of that stuff. Occultists like to make him out as being tapped into occult currents so they can imply he was actually possessed of occult knowledge, but he was writing scary stories and was more influenced by Poe and Machen. The guy knew his stories weren't real--he gave Robert Bloch permission to kill him in a story, signed by Yog-Sothoth and his other gods. He then returned the favor in 'The Haunter of the Dark'. These pulp guys were all fooling around and didn't take their stuff that seriously.

10
Reviews / Re: Cha'alt: Fuchsia Malaise Review
« on: February 11, 2021, 09:46:59 PM »
'Tis fun, weird, and gonzo. Brings me back to when RPGs were down there with heavy metal. Glad I bought it. :)

11
Oh God. I'm a halfie myself but this is ridiculous.

(1) The dwarves were a good race, for starters, so I don't find it particularly offensive.  People love to make Scottish and German dwarves, probably because it fits the existing dwarven stereotypes; I was aware of the 'Jewish' origins of Tolkien's dwarves but it didn't seem to carry over to D&D, where other stereotypes like drinking and fighting (not typical Jewish stereotypes) were a bigger deal.

(2) I kind of thought D&D's gnomes (as of about 2e) might be a little Jewish, what with the bonus to INT, the big noses, and the love of money and jokes, but then again, they were good guys; I'd be much more upset about drow or orcs.

(3) Gygax swiped the golem and the phylactery from Judaism...just like he swiped the rakshasa from India, gold dragons from China, Tiamat from Babylonia, griffins from Iran and Egypt, and lots of other stuff. This was way before people were worried about cultural appropriation, mercifully.

(4) The author has ignored all the clerical spells clearly taken from the Bible...Sticks to Snakes, Lower Water, Part Water, Insect Plague come to mind. Gygax was a Christian and when writing the cleric class these would have been natural examples to come to mind.

What's going on, IMHO, is all the lefty social-justice Jews are realizing they don't have enough 'intersectionality' points and are going to get discriminated against with the other white people...not to mention saying you're oppressed gets you victim points and gets other lefties to defend you. Forget about inventing relativity, the atom bomb, the polio vaccine, and just about every major comic book character, you get points by being picked on these days.

12
The RPGPundit's Own Forum / Re: Stonks
« on: January 30, 2021, 03:22:24 PM »
I don't think AOC's stupid.

She was elected by a very progressive district that no doubt enjoys the thought of being on 'the right side of history' (or perhaps the left side). She's a rookie representative, who would normally have little influence. By taking extreme positions and giving the impression of being a strong advocate for leftism, she gains media attention and thus currency she can exchange for influence among her fellow Democrats. If I'm a congressman in a left-leaning district, I am afraid of a public spat with AOC.

Similarly, her comparison of Ben Shapiro's attempt to debate her to catcalling a while back might seem silly to you and me. I agree a conservative pundit picking a fight with a progressive politician is not the same as a construction worker whistling at her as she walks by. But by making the comparison she gets to 1. pick a fight with Ben Shapiro, who with his conservative dress and big vocabulary is practically an Evil Conservative White Guy from central casting, and raise her profile 2. get lots of 'you go, girl!' support from feminists who are a big chunk of her base.

Now is all this grandstanding good for the country? That's another story.

13
Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion / Re: Toads
« on: January 30, 2021, 09:21:46 AM »
Temple of the Frog was indeed the first-ever module, I think.

They were common familiars for witches.

I always wondered about the Ice Toad in 1e D&D; they're as smart as a human and have their own 'weird language'. Nobody ever seemed to pick this one up and run with it. The grippli were frog people in various editions of D&D (I know at least 1 and 3).

Poison dart frogs live in the rainforest and are often brightly colored. They get their poisonous skin from insects that they eat. Tribes that live there sometimes use their poisonous secretions to poison blow darts for hunting. There's research into turning some of these poisons into useful drugs (not as nuts as it sounds...a common drug for high blood pressure was modified from a snake's venom that kills by...lowering blood pressure).

If you have a very silly game you can put meme jokes in about Pepe and the like.

14
I'm convinced that no one ever actually plays these games.

There are some liberal-themed story games that at least get played a fair amount at least within the small niche of storygamers. Examples of these might be Night Witches (a game about female Soviet bomber pilots in WWII) and Bluebeard's Bride (a feminist fairy tale horror game). They don't get played very widely - but that's true of nearly all small-press games.

On the other hand, there are some that as far as I can tell get talked about more than played. Steal Away Jordan and Kagematsu got a lot of attention, but I haven't seen them played even in my story game circles. And then some don't even get talked about much, and are basically just someone's pet project.

I've heard it said even the people who design these indie games play a lot of D&D, just because of network effects. Wonder if it's true. It is funny how after 45 years D&D remains the industry leader by a mile even as every hardcore gamer can come up with 50 things wrong with it.

I kind of wonder if a game can be an art form even if it's not played. Certainly the creativity that goes into a lot of these is pretty impressive, politics aside.

15
For extra confusion, in America the word 'liberal' means 'moderate progressive' or generally 'center-left', whereas in Europe it means 'classical liberal' or what Americans would call 'libertarian', considered a position on the right.

I was curious about games from the perspective of any of the groups on the right, whether libertarian/classical liberal, European throne-and-altar conservatism (probably the closest American analog would be paleoconservatism as we never had a throne or a state altar in our history as a separate nation), or something between the two.

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