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Messages - Eirikrautha

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 17
1
Nah, I don't use CR. Just word problem math with very poor fun returns. Faster to use Hit Dice or XP Tiers to eyeball something to slot into the Encounter Table. For Set Piece Battles, such as an Adventure's typical hingepoint, I liked those being more according to the XP Tier and Setting Fiction's Context.

No need to complicate the job of a GM to scare away future GMs. We are not there to ensure safety and success, as if we are designing bowling lanes with guard bumpers to prevent gutterballs. The players get to pick their challenges (even in most published Adventures to some extent), so let players enjoy the fun of figuring out how. GMing should be a fun hosting experience, not like CPA forensic accounting.  8)
Yes.  It really should have been discarded as a relic of 3rd edition and it's over-systemetization of everything.

Posts like these are a strong argument for why forums should have a "like" button...

2
So pursuit can end with the pursued in-sight at 151+ feet? Do the pursuers not even try using ranged weapons and spells? Is it some weird video game where the characters have left the zone so the monsters reset?
Dude, I want to see you fire a longbow at a fleeing creature 150' away, while also running full out yourself to maintain that distance.  In fact, video it and put it on Youtube.  I need the humor right now...
Nothing in D&D is like real life.

Congratulations, you've almost figured it out.

Now, the next question is: should it be?  And does your answer to that question invalidate your original complaint that I responded to?

3
So pursuit can end with the pursued in-sight at 151+ feet? Do the pursuers not even try using ranged weapons and spells? Is it some weird video game where the characters have left the zone so the monsters reset?
Dude, I want to see you fire a longbow at a fleeing creature 150' away, while also running full out yourself to maintain that distance.  In fact, video it and put it on Youtube.  I need the humor right now...

4
The third was Star Citizen and.... yeah. (Note: I only ever put out $ for the basic game 7-8 years back, so not that bad. Did not put down $100s on potential future fake space ships.)


Star Citizen is a PC game isnt it? Those are notorious for having long delays sometimes or just never delivering. But PC game creation is different from a board game or RPG.

One of my friends has backed a few and usually its been a year or more before release. Sometimes sooner with demos and the like. But a year wait or more has been how at least two went.

Dude, the Star Citizen Kickstarter was in 2012.  So it's a little more than "delayed."  It has become the poster-child of projects that make money through continuous fundraising, as opposed to actually producing anything (it isn't really even in alpha, at this point... more of a glorified tech demo).  When people think "over-promise," Star Citizen is the image that pops into their head...

5
Wtf is "Holdoing"? Also, I thought we weren't supposed to assume anyone's gender, or does that only apply when it won't benefit them? Like I will be nicer to chicks, but it's bad to be nicer to chicks unless they are getting free drinks, even though I'm a terrible person for assuming they want a free drink or that they're female, but I had better buy them that drink lest I be an asshole.

And then modern Western women wonder why they're dying alone with their cats...
It's doing a heckin' sexism by criticising TBP moderator Qweens (:pray:) because something, something, toxic masculinity means those who're identified as women receive more 'blowback on moderator decisions'.

The term probably refers to when people were critical of Holdo in The Last Jedi, but the pushback against that from the Usual Suspects came in the form of "you just can't tolerate a Strong Woman(tm) in a position of authority!" rather than because both her leadership strategy and actions were genuinely terrible.
This, pretty much. What surprises me is that they opted to call it 'Holdo-ing' since the character in question really wasn't particularly competent (I've heard comparisons to the infamous Steiner 'social generals' from Battletech. Fairly apt, in my opinion).

But yeah, they consider any criticism of their oh-so-fragile fem moderators as 'Holdo-ing'. How dare you! (spoken in snotty Swedish accent)

The only way you can question a mod call is to email their general gmail account... which may get read, eventually. No guarantees they'll get back to you.

The best part is the assumption that when certain moderators are complained about more, it is a function of the complainers, not the mod.  Maybe the fact that a mod gets more complaints is because they are worse at it?  "Holdoing" serves the same purpose as accusations of racism.  It acts as a shield for the incompetent.  See, there are stupid people of every race, color, and creed.  By reflexively rejecting responsibility for performance, these accusations serve to immunize the stupid who deserve to be rejected.  Good mods (or anything, really) don't need that much defending.  So SJWism is really just a defense mechanism for those that are actually inferior.  It just conflates legitimate complaints about inferiority with baseless ones about race and sex.  "No, I can't be a moron.  I'm a woman!"

6
Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion / Re: I don't like CR.
« on: February 24, 2021, 11:15:51 PM »
Older versions of DnD never gave one shit about so called Balance.

Look at the wandering monster tables, while adventuring through the Mountains you encounter (rolls dice) 1d6 Dragons.
Those were the wilderness encounter tables and meant for only high level parties. If you were in a first level of a dungeon, you'd never encounter dragons like that.

It's a joke to say that AD&D wasn't supposed to have encounter balance when every single adventure module was sold based on the expected level of the party playing through it. Just because there weren't any hard and fast rules in the DMG on how to balance adventures to the party level, doesn't mean that this wasn't the expectation.

Yes Adventure writers wanted balance but ADnD gave no fucks for balance.

Yeah.  Good thing the same people that published the adventures weren't the same people that published AD&D.  Oh, wait...

And aren't you one of the people in another thread who was arguing that ancillary materials prove that AD&D had monster races as a standard?  And now ancillary materials like adventures don't count?

Goalposts ------>

You

Yep, I am the one who said monstrous races were balanced.

Oh wait, no that was you.

Of course if I used your "logic" then I would just say that the adventures made in 3e were "balanced" and therefore CR works just fine.

But that would be an idiot thing to try and claim.
Ok, I literally laughed at your response.  It's not even coherent, much less addressing anything that has been stated.  In fact, it states things that are demonstrably untrue (I look forward to the quote where I said monstrous races are balanced).  Quit while you are behind...

7
It also make the morality of zombies more confusing than it should be. In folklore, zombies are enslaved innocents*. Using them is slavery and slavery is evil. In D&D the zombie isn’t any more intelligent than a domestic animal (in 5e) or a robot (in 3.x) and are evil in alignment. Why are the zombies evil and why is animating them evil? It feels... arbitrary.

* I recall hearing that sometimes people may actually pay a bokor to turn someone else (usually a person reviled in the family or community) into a zombie, but I don’t know the details.

Per 1st edition rules, animating the dead pulls negative energy into the prime material plane, and negative energy is inimical to all life.  And, if I'm remembering the rules correctly, an undead that is not controlled by its creator (who makes periodic checks to do so) immediately attacks and kills any living creature it encounters, due to the driving force of the negative energy used to create it.  So yeah, making them is evil...

8
Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion / Re: I don't like CR.
« on: February 24, 2021, 06:38:51 PM »
Older versions of DnD never gave one shit about so called Balance.

Look at the wandering monster tables, while adventuring through the Mountains you encounter (rolls dice) 1d6 Dragons.
Those were the wilderness encounter tables and meant for only high level parties. If you were in a first level of a dungeon, you'd never encounter dragons like that.

It's a joke to say that AD&D wasn't supposed to have encounter balance when every single adventure module was sold based on the expected level of the party playing through it. Just because there weren't any hard and fast rules in the DMG on how to balance adventures to the party level, doesn't mean that this wasn't the expectation.

Yes Adventure writers wanted balance but ADnD gave no fucks for balance.

Yeah.  Good thing the same people that published the adventures weren't the same people that published AD&D.  Oh, wait...

And aren't you one of the people in another thread who was arguing that ancillary materials prove that AD&D had monster races as a standard?  And now ancillary materials like adventures don't count?

Goalposts ------>

You

9
The original assumption was that the player was a straight white male, thus the SJW shriek-and-swarm. *Then* it was discovered the the player is a woman of color, at which point hilarity ensued.

Not only did hilarity ensue they refused to apologize for their mistake and claimed they were blameless because the puppet had triggered some kind of sexual dimorphism or something similar.

They never apologise.

That's why they win.  We'd do well to learn that lesson.  You only apologize when you are truly sorry, and when the person you are apologizing to is willing to forgive.  SJWs never forgive.  They just use your apology as a further weapon against you.  The best response to the SJWs in gaming is to state the truth and never apologize for it.

10
Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion / Re: I don't like CR.
« on: February 24, 2021, 03:35:05 PM »
Older versions of DnD never gave one shit about so called Balance.

Look at the wandering monster tables, while adventuring through the Mountains you encounter (rolls dice) 1d6 Dragons.

I see you are agreeing with me (based on what I posted above).  Older versions never cared about encounter balance at all.  Combat balance is different...

11
Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion / Re: I don't like CR.
« on: February 24, 2021, 02:30:04 PM »
I find it amazing that a game that worries so much about balance--as D&D has since 3e--can't figure out a way to make a CR system (or some other measure of "encounter balance") worth a shit. Sure, not everyone would use such a system even if it were flawless, but I'd rather not have a greatly flawed system that many do try to use fucking up a game.
It's because the newer versions of D&D have almost no balance.  They can't.  As the number of "fiddly bits" in character abilities, powers, spells, etc., increase, the ability to "balance" the game (i.e. have similar outcomes across varied characters) grows more and more difficult.  The more character "choices," the more that unexpected synergies crop up.

It's also the reason that people who complain that the game was less balanced in the early editions are objectively wrong (at least with respect to combat efficiency).  While fighters and magic-users definitely had different power curves, there were no "builds" to create synergies (the best you could do is find complimentary magic items).  It was far easier to have a consistent play experience (combat-wise) in AD&D than in 5e, so "CR" was unneeded (HD worked well enough).

This is why 5e's CR system is hot garbage.  First, it cannot take into account monster's own ability synergies; second, it cannot factor in the action economy.  Third, it cannot account for PC builds or variable effectiveness.  At most, it is a simple reflection of a monster's HP, to hit, and damage potential per round.  And, honestly, you'd be better off just listing monsters by those qualities than trying to create a system that can design the "proper" number of encounters per day via "experience budgets," etc.

And all this is only a problem if you subscribe to the very modern notion that every encounter (combat or no) should be scaled so that it is winnable by the party (survivable is different).  Some of my party's very best experiences have been fighting retreats while they are getting mauled, setting up a revenge fight several levels later.  It's why I lament that 5e's random encounter tables are by CR first, and not by environment.  If you're on the plains of the Serengeti, you don't get to not encounter a lion just because you aren't prepared to face one...

12
Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion / Re: Ravenloft 5E
« on: February 23, 2021, 11:25:15 AM »
Sorry, but Ravenloft has got to be the most over-hyped setting in D&D.  I mean, I understand its appeal (somewhat), as it does present a different thematic feel.  But seriously, the mechanics of D&D have never really fit the thematic elements of Gothic horror, and Ravenloft really doesn't fix that (as far as I've seen).  I'm glad folks enjoy it, but I always feel a little... juvenile... whenever we attempt a campaign.  Like we should be teenage girls getting all hot and bothered over the menacing (yet somehow suave and romantic) Strahd.  I guess the whole WoD stuff has permanently warped my view of vampires in RPGs, and not for the positive.  At least Ravenloft doesn't seem to be designed to use to hit on tween girls (like Vampire: the Masquerade)...

13
Articles / Re: Dark Albion Questions
« on: February 21, 2021, 03:20:17 PM »
Guns punch right through plate armor

It's much quicker to train a gunman than use the English Longbow.
False, and true.  Early firearms did not punch through plate (in fact, many surviving sets of armor from that period have visible "proving" marks where they were tested by firing a firearm at them and showing it would not penetrate).  Instead, really heavy armor was a response to early firearms (you didn't need full plate to stop a sword or spear).  Later, when the power and availability of firearms became more of a factor, they did become much easier to equip troops with (and far easier to train them in using).  From that point forward, heavy armor became more trouble than it was worth...

14
(3) Gygax swiped the golem and the phylactery from Judaism...just like he swiped the rakshasa from India, gold dragons from China, Tiamat from Babylonia, griffins from Iran and Egypt, and lots of other stuff. This was way before people were worried about cultural appropriation, mercifully.
And often stripped away what made them interesting in the first place. There's cultural appreciation, and then there's creatively bankrupt.

For example, the mythological griffin could detect deposits of precious metals (which they hoarded like magpies), laid agate eggs, its feathers could cure blindness, a drinking horn made from a griffon talon would change color in the presence of poison, etc. There were also a bunch of different varieties like axex, keythong, alce, etc.

The D&D griffon is just a living taxidermy that sometimes you can use as a mount.

Aside from the agate eggs, the rest of the info, while cool, is relatively irrelevant in a game where clerics can detect poison and cure blindness with spells.  In our real world, where clerics don't exist, it's a bigger deal...

15
Is Spelljammer actually any good? Serious question. I started playing Rifts about the time it came out and thought it was a bad knockoff, never really gave it a chance.
It's not a knock-off of RIFTS. They're not even in the same vicinity.

Pre-Spelljammer D&D had a lot of mechanics for traveling between planes, but aside from a few handwavy mentions of gates or that appendix in the Manual of the Planes, it never really delved into how travel between different alternate worlds within the Prime worked. Spelljammer answers that question.

And it does it using space travel. Except it's not science or science fiction space travel. It's space travel based on pre-modern cosmological theories like celestial spheres and luminiferous ether. Basically, each campaign setting (Dragonlance, Forgotten Realms, your own, other worlds they made up) is in a solar system surrounded by a giant crystal sphere. Crazy flying ships shaped like animals or other weird things can travel between planets (bodies) within a single crystal sphere, and can cross the (highly explosive and flammable) phlogiston between spheres.

As with all 2e settings, there are some issues, for instance too great a dependence on casters (ships fly using helms -- think helming a ship, not armor for the head -- which are almost always powered by casters), but conceptually it's a lot of fun, the ship designs are fantastic, and the setting components are great. For instance, beholders are more concerned with their own internal war of racial purity so they might trade peacefully with outsiders, spider slavers with umber hulk muscle are common in ports, an powerful elven armada keeps peace, and religious factions (Ptah is big) have to deal with the connection to their god varying from sphere to sphere, and more. A lot of high concept ideas, leavened with some silliness (sometimes both -- humanoid hippos with monocles and military uniforms sound absurd, but the giff are one of the most popular and well developed elements of the setting).
This is a good and accurate summary.   If you're looking for adventures on the high seas but even more gonzo, this your bag.

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