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The Torus, a serial numbers filed Ringworld

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Pat:
I would probably make sense if the structure was composed of individual modules, and a thread of some super-strong material that strings them together. Creating a tube with a diameter of 2 AU in one go, after all, seems prohibitively difficult. It would be easier to create independent modules, say the size of a world or a moon, then spin a giant piece of thread around the Sun, and attach them. This allows the tubeworld to grow incrementally over time, starting with just a relative handful of modules attached to a naked string, and then gradually filling out the ring. This allows older generation modules mixed with newer generation modules, and if we assume it's a polysocietal or even multi-species construct, then you can have modules in completely different styles and with different living environments.

Pat:
There's also the mass problem. Creating a torus that huge might require stripping several solar systems of material. Which would be easier in the galactic core, where the stars are much closer to each other. But the core isn't friendly to a lot of life. So it might make sense to build the string in the core, and then starting traveling to more hospitable regions. How? Make the string magnetic, and use it to manipulate the Sun, turning it into a giant stellar engine. Then begin the journey toward the outer rim of the galaxy. This would take millions of years, long enough to start to fill in the torus with modules from new galactic civilizations, as the torus passes into regions they find hospitable. And why stop there? Maybe the ultimate purpose of the tour isn't just to tour the galaxy, but to escape the galaxy. This is a giant solar system-sized spaceship that's going on a billion-year journey to explore the Local Group.

GeekyBugle:

--- Quote from: Pat on May 21, 2022, 09:14:21 AM ---I would probably make sense if the structure was composed of individual modules, and a thread of some super-strong material that strings them together. Creating a tube with a diameter of 2 AU in one go, after all, seems prohibitively difficult. It would be easier to create independent modules, say the size of a world or a moon, then spin a giant piece of thread around the Sun, and attach them. This allows the tubeworld to grow incrementally over time, starting with just a relative handful of modules attached to a naked string, and then gradually filling out the ring. This allows older generation modules mixed with newer generation modules, and if we assume it's a polysocietal or even multi-species construct, then you can have modules in completely different styles and with different living environments.

--- End quote ---

The idea isn't bad, I like it, what do you mean by: "modules in completely different styles and with different living environments"?


--- Quote from: Pat on May 21, 2022, 09:37:10 AM ---There's also the mass problem. Creating a torus that huge might require stripping several solar systems of material. Which would be easier in the galactic core, where the stars are much closer to each other. But the core isn't friendly to a lot of life. So it might make sense to build the string in the core, and then starting traveling to more hospitable regions. How? Make the string magnetic, and use it to manipulate the Sun, turning it into a giant stellar engine. Then begin the journey toward the outer rim of the galaxy. This would take millions of years, long enough to start to fill in the torus with modules from new galactic civilizations, as the torus passes into regions they find hospitable. And why stop there? Maybe the ultimate purpose of the tour isn't just to tour the galaxy, but to escape the galaxy. This is a giant solar system-sized spaceship that's going on a billion-year journey to explore the Local Group.

--- End quote ---

Yes! I had thought about turning it's star into an engine this morning while walking the dog. And if it's an engine it also is a weapon.

The mass problem is an interesting one, especially since the material needs to be nigh indestructible, maybe they were in a pit stop to find more resources when something happened and the construct remained parked there. It's a solar system with no inner planets but it has the giant exterior planets.

Maybe they used to stop and strip mine solar systems including their stars?

But the tripulation died for some unknown cause and the construct is still parked there.

Pat:

--- Quote from: GeekyBugle on May 21, 2022, 11:22:39 AM ---
--- Quote from: Pat on May 21, 2022, 09:14:21 AM ---I would probably make sense if the structure was composed of individual modules, and a thread of some super-strong material that strings them together. Creating a tube with a diameter of 2 AU in one go, after all, seems prohibitively difficult. It would be easier to create independent modules, say the size of a world or a moon, then spin a giant piece of thread around the Sun, and attach them. This allows the tubeworld to grow incrementally over time, starting with just a relative handful of modules attached to a naked string, and then gradually filling out the ring. This allows older generation modules mixed with newer generation modules, and if we assume it's a polysocietal or even multi-species construct, then you can have modules in completely different styles and with different living environments.

--- End quote ---

The idea isn't bad, I like it, what do you mean by: "modules in completely different styles and with different living environments"?

--- End quote ---
One way to think of it as a train with no end. The modules would be the cars, though of course the cars might be the size of worlds. There could be ancient modules, and newer ones in newer styles and based on newer technologies. The disparity could be immense, since we're potentially talking about deep time, not just a few years, centuries, or even millennia. Then consider modules added by different civilizations. They might have very different needs and styles. Or species -- there could be water modules, or near-vacuums, and so on. Some modules might have shared environments with their neighbors, with the "doors" between the modules open.

Others might be closed, because of incompatible environments, or worries of ecological contamination. It would still make sense to have a standard common ground, so travelers could pass down the torus, but the common ground is most likely a contained vacuum. Say a torus within a torus, an internal tube with no impeding air. That would allow transit using mono-ships, that are propelled magnetically or gravitically, and which could use gravity differentials or centrifugal force to reach ridiculous speeds, like particles in a collider.

Incidentally, you don't have to "park" it anywhere. Since a stellar engine is based on sublight travel, perhaps very slow sublight travel with transit times in the millions of years, it could be on its way to its next stop and still approachable or visitable. Not dissimilar to the Puppeteer's Fleet of Worlds, except much grander in scope.

GeekyBugle:

--- Quote from: Pat on May 21, 2022, 01:14:05 PM ---
--- Quote from: GeekyBugle on May 21, 2022, 11:22:39 AM ---
--- Quote from: Pat on May 21, 2022, 09:14:21 AM ---I would probably make sense if the structure was composed of individual modules, and a thread of some super-strong material that strings them together. Creating a tube with a diameter of 2 AU in one go, after all, seems prohibitively difficult. It would be easier to create independent modules, say the size of a world or a moon, then spin a giant piece of thread around the Sun, and attach them. This allows the tubeworld to grow incrementally over time, starting with just a relative handful of modules attached to a naked string, and then gradually filling out the ring. This allows older generation modules mixed with newer generation modules, and if we assume it's a polysocietal or even multi-species construct, then you can have modules in completely different styles and with different living environments.

--- End quote ---

The idea isn't bad, I like it, what do you mean by: "modules in completely different styles and with different living environments"?

--- End quote ---
One way to think of it as a train with no end. The modules would be the cars, though of course the cars might be the size of worlds. There could be ancient modules, and newer ones in newer styles and based on newer technologies. The disparity could be immense, since we're potentially talking about deep time, not just a few years, centuries, or even millennia. Then consider modules added by different civilizations. They might have very different needs and styles. Or species -- there could be water modules, or near-vacuums, and so on. Some modules might have shared environments with their neighbors, with the "doors" between the modules open.

Others might be closed, because of incompatible environments, or worries of ecological contamination. It would still make sense to have a standard common ground, so travelers could pass down the torus, but the common ground is most likely a contained vacuum. Say a torus within a torus, an internal tube with no impeding air. That would allow transit using mono-ships, that are propelled magnetically or gravitically, and which could use gravity differentials or centrifugal force to reach ridiculous speeds, like particles in a collider.

Incidentally, you don't have to "park" it anywhere. Since a stellar engine is based on sublight travel, perhaps very slow sublight travel with transit times in the millions of years, it could be on its way to its next stop and still approachable or visitable. Not dissimilar to the Puppeteer's Fleet of Worlds, except much grander in scope.

--- End quote ---

Okay, now I grok it.

You're thinking more of a ship/space station than an artificial world, what would the collector build if he was into preserving whole worlds? something like you postulate with closed modules. I was thinking more of a unique world. So the "Natives" (in the case of the tripulation all dying out) have forgotten they live in an artificial construct. But since it's so big you could have both at the same time, just imagine 13 million earths unfolded and sewn together, I reccon there's more than enough room for both being true.

Maybe it's a space ark? The builders are escaping the galaxy and saving/kidnapping whole worlds (the living things) into their ship.

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