Forum > Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion

The greatest trick the GM ever played....

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David R:
...was making the players think he never existed.

When your players say, that it was a great game, they really had fun, and it was as if you( the GM) were not running the game, but rather playing in the game with them....wait untill they encounter the Dragon. (Joke, joke...i joke because i have the monsters guide as a "players manual").

Regards,
David R.

David R:
What is the greatest misconception you learnt about GMing when running games?

With me i guess, it would be that my vision although appreciated did not necesarrily translate to either player enjoyment or participation...learnt that the hard way.

Regards,
David R.

Maddman:

--- Quote from: David R ---What is the greatest misconception you learnt about GMing when running games?
--- End quote ---


You don't have to have everything prepared ahead of time.

Making a game "realistic" will not make it any more fun.

From a GM's perspective a PC's background is not nearly as relevent as a strong concept.

The most telling aspect of a game's quality is how well the pacing matches the player's mood.

Levi Kornelsen:

--- Quote from: Maddman ---The most telling aspect of a game's quality is how well the pacing matches the player's mood.
--- End quote ---


Matches or creates, I'd say.

Yeah, I'm nitpicking.  Sorry.

obryn:
I've learned that, no matter how little I prepare ahead of time, my players will only get through half of it by the end of the night.

I've learned that it's the little things and cheap tricks which stick in my players' minds.  (For instance, in CoC, I occasionally startle them during tense scenes.  I do little things like slamming my hand on a table, subtly throwing a coin at the wall behind them, or covertly play a sound file on my laptop.  Tonight, I'm going to start playing insane pipe music on a computer a few rooms away with a 3-minute silence gap preceding it...)

Finally, I've learned that I don't need to know exactly where everything is going in a campaign.  If I throw in a random spooky occurrence, NPC, or tiny reference, all I need is a note to myself.  I can work it in later on down the road, making me look like I had brilliantly planned it that way all along.  This gives a fantastic illusion of consistency that's flexible enough I can work with whatever the players want to do. :)

-O

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