Forum > Pen and Paper Roleplaying Games (RPGs) Discussion

So, a little bit about Soulbound...

(1/6) > >>

HappyDaze:
Spinning off from another thread:

Soulbound is a D6 pool-based RPG by Cubicle 7 set in Games Workshop's Age of Sigmar world.

What's the world like? It has some common elements with Warhammer Fantasy, particularly the gods, but it's a very different setting. It's designed for mythic fantasy with high-powered heroes walking the same worlds (yes, plural--there are eight "Mortal Realms" and a few other demi-words beyond those) as the characters. Here Sigmar is literally the God-King and players could conceivably have a conversation with him or the other gods. The baseline magic level of the setting is considerably higher than the Old World of WFRP. Anyway, after the death of the Old World, the gods all got together and made the worlds better places...until their alliance fragmented. Then Chaos came and shit got bad. A long time later (no hard timeline dates) Sigmar lauches his big counterpush with his new army of Stormcast Eternals, and the results lead to the current Age of Sigmar.

The PCs in this setting are the Soulbound. Essentially, back when the gods were all buddied up, they came up with a ritual to unite bands of mortals into special ops teams. The Soulbound did some cool stuff in the prehistory but were largely gone by the time the gods broke up their club and Chaos invaded. But now the gods are again seeing the need for them, so the various factions contibute their quirky badasses to form Soulbound Bindings. This is how the game gives us ways to combine a bunch of oddballs together in one party.

Characters are built by choosing a faction, a species (many factions only have a single species), then an archetype. The archetype gives you your basic options for attributes, skills, talents, and equipment. In all cases, each archetype has certain fixed/mandatory bits and some optional bits to select from a short list. Character creation can be very quick.

The mechanics are based on a D6 pool with tasks set as X:Y where X is the target number and Y is how many successes are needed. In general, extra successes beyond the Y give a better result. For many tasks, the X is set to 4, with advantage shifting it to 3 (or 2 with greater advantage) or disadvantage shifting it to 5 (or 6 with greater disadvantage). In combat, the X is determined by comparing the attacker's Melee/Accuracy with the defender's Defence (these values are based on Attribute + Skill combos and modified by certain talents and gear, like shields that improve defence). There are lots of general combat options--even without considering the special options offered by some talents--are fairly robust.

Spellcasting provides versatility--a starting spellcaster gets 6 spells for the cost of one talent--but some of the spells are hard to cast and there are penalties to failing the casting roll (some of them are really bad too).

Miracles (used by Blessed priests of various tyoes) are rather powerful and generally provide more kick than spells. The downside is that each miralce costs a talent, so the priest typcially has fewer effects available than a spellcaster.

There's a lot more I can cover, but does anyone have any specific questions?

oggsmash:
  I would assume most adventures center around finding tools to combat chaos/investigating chaos incursions or the like?   I am curious as to how advancement works (more granular like Gurps or Savage worlds, or more big bump like a level gain in D&D or Pathfinder).

oggsmash:
 I do not know if you are familiar with the boardgames using Age of Sigmar miniatures (the silver tower, shadows over hammerfell) that are essentially dungeon crawlers.   But if so, are the themes similar for the most part in the game, or is it a bit more meta themed as compared to WHFRP (where it seemed most adventures are pretty grounded in helping or accomplishing things on a smaller scale). 

HappyDaze:

--- Quote from: oggsmash on September 21, 2021, 07:59:38 PM ---  I would assume most adventures center around finding tools to combat chaos/investigating chaos incursions or the like?   I am curious as to how advancement works (more granular like Gurps or Savage worlds, or more big bump like a level gain in D&D or Pathfinder).

--- End quote ---
Soulbound Bindings are created and initially tasked with quests of various types, but they are also allowed a lot of autonomy after that to do whatever is necessary for the cause of Order (or Death, if you have the Champions of Death sourcebook and want to play a Binding of undead).

Advancement is entirely based on goals. The Binding has a short-term and a long-term goal. When they are completed they give XP and you choose another goal. Each character also has individual short-term and long-term goals that work almost the same way. There are no character levels, when you get XP, you spend it directly to raise an attribute/skill rank (escalaing costs) or buy a new talent (each talent is 2 XP). Between adventures, there is a system of "Endeavours" that covers things like making new gear, learning new spells, training companion beasts, and a lot more.

HappyDaze:

--- Quote from: oggsmash on September 21, 2021, 08:03:46 PM --- I do not know if you are familiar with the boardgames using Age of Sigmar miniatures (the silver tower, shadows over hammerfell) that are essentially dungeon crawlers.   But if so, are the themes similar for the most part in the game, or is it a bit more meta themed as compared to WHFRP (where it seemed most adventures are pretty grounded in helping or accomplishing things on a smaller scale).

--- End quote ---
I'm not familiar with any of those, so I couldn't say if they are similar or not.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version