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OSR Rules for Modern Classes

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RPGPundit:
When you use #OSR rules to modify #dnd for modern-setting play in a world resembling ours, do character classes even make sense?
#ttrpg

Godsmonkey:

--- Quote from: RPGPundit on October 19, 2021, 02:06:08 AM ---When you use #OSR rules to modify #dnd for modern-setting play in a world resembling ours, do character classes even make sense?
#ttrpg



--- End quote ---

Your solution sounds like a nice balance between traditional OSR concepts and skill based games like Call of Cthulhu.

The concept of gaining combat bonuses based on the number of combats you've survived is interesting, and does make sense. I mean what better way to learn than by not dying?

RPGPundit:

--- Quote from: Godsmonkey on October 19, 2021, 09:37:38 AM ---
--- Quote from: RPGPundit on October 19, 2021, 02:06:08 AM ---When you use #OSR rules to modify #dnd for modern-setting play in a world resembling ours, do character classes even make sense?
#ttrpg



--- End quote ---

Your solution sounds like a nice balance between traditional OSR concepts and skill based games like Call of Cthulhu.

The concept of gaining combat bonuses based on the number of combats you've survived is interesting, and does make sense. I mean what better way to learn than by not dying?

--- End quote ---

Yes. I'll note I was somewhat inspired by this after playing Aces & Eights.

PsyXypher:
A modern setting game with classes under OSR rules?

Not sure. I'd say have a starting kit of abilities ala Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead and just let the players develop as they go. Your "Class" is just who you were before it all went to shit, and it determines your equipment and starting skills. You might be just some guy who came to the shelter, maybe you're a meth-head in withdrawal, maybe you're a scientist who caused this mess, or maybe you're an expert martial artist.

But is that still OSR?

I'm too tired to come up with an answer.

GeekyBugle:

--- Quote from: PsyXypher on November 11, 2021, 12:38:49 AM ---A modern setting game with classes under OSR rules?

Not sure. I'd say have a starting kit of abilities ala Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead and just let the players develop as they go. Your "Class" is just who you were before it all went to shit, and it determines your equipment and starting skills. You might be just some guy who came to the shelter, maybe you're a meth-head in withdrawal, maybe you're a scientist who caused this mess, or maybe you're an expert martial artist.

But is that still OSR?

I'm too tired to come up with an answer.

--- End quote ---

Isn't that what classes are? The only difference I see is allowing everybody access to the same skills. So AD&D2e but removing the class skill restrictions.

So you learn new skills by trying to do stuff/studying/practice. "I try to ride the horse (Insert die roll here)", "okay you ride it, you have to go slower than everybody else so you find yourself often last in the group."

After this you have zero in your modifier for riding horses, making it easier next time (or maybe +1?)

After enough times of you riding a horse you rise your modifier to +2 (or take into account critical success).

Apply this for any skill you allowed in the game.

Of course in a modern setting some skills can't be learned by just trying: "Hacking" a computer, I would argue can't be learned unless you have spent some time studying how to do so or have some previous "computer skill".

So you change the class restricctions to attribute restrictions + type of skill restrictions.

This isn't really that different from RAW AD&D2e

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