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Author Topic: Bad experiences with certain ttrpg communities  (Read 3670 times)

Shawn Driscoll

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Re: Bad experiences with certain ttrpg communities
« Reply #75 on: September 19, 2022, 03:30:53 PM »
Anyone had bad experiences?
Just mention Trump and see what a community does.

BoxCrayonTales

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Re: Bad experiences with certain ttrpg communities
« Reply #76 on: September 19, 2022, 04:57:07 PM »
supermodel leprechauns that grant wishes

What
The plot of an actual paranormal romance novel that I threw in as a joke. 99% of urban fantasy now is paranormal romance, but if you can get past the deluge of "the hero is the last of a dying race of vampires/werewolves/unicorns/leprechauns/dragons/angels/whatever and needs to seduce/impregnate the heroine" (which is like 99% of the genre now for god knows why) some of the stories are creative enough to inspire a useful adventure hook.

But even silly romance novel plots could probably provide entertaining side quests if nothing else. "Trevor the Vampire is leader of the Boy Band Clan. Unless Trevor finds his one true love and turns him/her into a vampire, then Trevor and his clan will spontaneously die in a few weeks on his hundredth vampire birthday. Does Trevor have any evidence this will actually happen? The vampire(s) in the party who know their vampire arcana says this is false superstition that maybe could happen rarely due to the placebo/nocebo effect, but you're not gonna tell Trevor otherwise when he says he'll pay you to find his one true love for him."

RPG as Service is a pipe dream by the Clueless with visions of WoW money in their eyes. No visionary sociopaths are in the mix because they all know actual video games would make massively more money with a much wider market than slow turn by turn system with worse graphics.

The advantage of traditional RPGs is the ability of “fanatic”-tier GMs to develop campaigns and improvise outcomes for a truly off-the-rails adventure experience for the mops and that’s REALLY hard to scale up… ultimately resulting in trying to get mops to be GMs to grow the base… but mops only want to run adventure path and prebuilt campaigns and lack the improv skill that really makes tabletop unique.

Thus, failure is the only option.
I don't know if I'll ever release an RPG, but I try to deliberately cultivate that kind of creativity by including all sorts of weird (but genre appropriate) shit in my settings. For example, in secret world type urban fantasy you have a ton of leeway: You can have serial killers who murder people in their dreams, small scale zombie apocalypses, underground aztec snakepire cults, antichrist candidates that work for the Vatican to hunt monsters, reincarnated dragons from Atlantis, supermodel leprechauns that grant wishes, and more.
Dude, I will pay money for that kind of game.
Thanks for the vote of confidence

jeff37923

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Re: Bad experiences with certain ttrpg communities
« Reply #77 on: September 19, 2022, 10:25:01 PM »
RPG as Service is a pipe dream by the Clueless with visions of WoW money in their eyes. No visionary sociopaths are in the mix because they all know actual video games would make massively more money with a much wider market than slow turn by turn system with worse graphics.

The advantage of traditional RPGs is the ability of “fanatic”-tier GMs to develop campaigns and improvise outcomes for a truly off-the-rails adventure experience for the mops and that’s REALLY hard to scale up… ultimately resulting in trying to get mops to be GMs to grow the base… but mops only want to run adventure path and prebuilt campaigns and lack the improv skill that really makes tabletop unique.

Thus, failure is the only option.
I don't know if I'll ever release an RPG, but I try to deliberately cultivate that kind of creativity by including all sorts of weird (but genre appropriate) shit in my settings. For example, in secret world type urban fantasy you have a ton of leeway: You can have serial killers who murder people in their dreams, small scale zombie apocalypses, underground aztec snakepire cults, antichrist candidates that work for the Vatican to hunt monsters, reincarnated dragons from Atlantis, supermodel leprechauns that grant wishes, and more.
Dude, I will pay money for that kind of game.
Thanks for the vote of confidence

If you really believe that then you haven't watched the effect that Cyberpunk: Edgerunners has had yet.
"I do not want to create a story, I want to create a stage. The player characters will perform on that stage and interact with the setting. When the players talk to their friends about what their characters did, then there will be a story."