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Author Topic: I tried to watch an online game, and it just drug on without going anywhere....  (Read 1183 times)

Jam The MF

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I kept expecting the DM to roll a random encounter or something, but he wouldn't initiate anything in lieu of the players doing something.  After 20 or 30 minutes of random talking, I just gave up and exited the video.  It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion.

Now, imagine that being someone's initial exposure to D&D.  Like an episode of Seinfeld, it was a game about nothing; because nobody was actually playing the game.

Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

As a DM, how would you handle something like that?
« Last Edit: April 27, 2021, 01:17:06 AM by Jam The MF »
I need you to roll a perception check.

Sable Wyvern

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Are the players actually engaged and enjoying themselves? Then I let them do their thing.

jeff37923

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I kept expecting the DM to roll a random encounter or something, but he wouldn't initiate anything in lieu of the players doing something.  After 20 or 30 minutes of random talking, I just gave up and exited the video.  It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion.

Now, imagine that being someone's initial exposure to D&D.  Like an episode of Seinfeld, it was a game about nothing; because nobody was actually playing the game.

Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

As a DM, how would you handle something like that?

Have everyone roll initiative.
In media res

This Guy

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I kept expecting the DM to roll a random encounter or something, but he wouldn't initiate anything in lieu of the players doing something.  After 20 or 30 minutes of random talking, I just gave up and exited the video.  It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion.

Now, imagine that being someone's initial exposure to D&D.  Like an episode of Seinfeld, it was a game about nothing; because nobody was actually playing the game.

Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

As a DM, how would you handle something like that?

not being a fucking spectator sport
I don't want to play with you.

Mishihari

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As a DM, how would you handle something like that?

NINJAS ATTACK!!!

Jam The MF

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As a DM, how would you handle something like that?

NINJAS ATTACK!!!

Ha!!!  I love it.
I need you to roll a perception check.

Jam The MF

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I kept expecting the DM to roll a random encounter or something, but he wouldn't initiate anything in lieu of the players doing something.  After 20 or 30 minutes of random talking, I just gave up and exited the video.  It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion.

Now, imagine that being someone's initial exposure to D&D.  Like an episode of Seinfeld, it was a game about nothing; because nobody was actually playing the game.

Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

As a DM, how would you handle something like that?

Have everyone roll initiative.
In media res


I thought of having them roll initiative; but then I thought it would be better to have them make a perception check.  If they fail the perception check, they are caught by surprise.
I need you to roll a perception check.

robh

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.......It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion........Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

Pretty standard Storyteller system gaming then.   :(

HappyDaze

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I kept expecting the DM to roll a random encounter or something, but he wouldn't initiate anything in lieu of the players doing something.  After 20 or 30 minutes of random talking, I just gave up and exited the video.  It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion.

Now, imagine that being someone's initial exposure to D&D.  Like an episode of Seinfeld, it was a game about nothing; because nobody was actually playing the game.

Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

As a DM, how would you handle something like that?
Wasn't there an old joke about the typical RPG session having 10 minutes of exciting fun spread out over four hours of play?

Reckall

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Have everyone roll initiative.
In media res

Just play "We Will Remember Them" for World War Cthulhu. It is about a British Commando team doing a mission behind enemy lines in occupied Norway. The adventure starts with the mission only partially completed, but with the characters stranded on a mountain road after they crashed their truck. The players start the game literally half-way through the mission. What happened up to that point is actually played in flashbacks that go way back to their training. The "In Media Res" is strong in this one.

The ending, BTW, is one of the biggest mindfucks ever. When I ran it, my players made the mistake of becoming attached to their soldier characters. Never do that in CoC...  :D
« Last Edit: April 27, 2021, 07:40:58 AM by Reckall »
For every idiot who denounces Ayn Rand as "intellectualism" there is an excellent DM who creates a "Bioshock" adventure.

oggsmash

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  What online game was it?  Just some gamers recording a session?  I know we have some rules when we play that encourage game play, such as a timer for 50 minutes so that we take a 10-15 minute break for bullshitting, socializing, checking phones (I have a no phones at the table policy if I am GM'ing).  I find we keep the game moving much better that way and still get to socialize.  We always have a 3-4 hour session so the game moves along, we all get to talk and socialize and snack, and it feels like progress is made.  I would think if people were going to film a session they would have some guidelines put down before they started to keep the game rolling and maybe have an intermission break in the middle for people to pee, eat, etc.  Games are social, and often personal to the people playing together and that will not translate terribly well to film documentation if its all mushed together as a typical game session would be.

TJS

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Can't speak for the OP, but what he says seems to me to pretty well describe the hour or so of Critical Role I watched before giving up.

The one or two other times I watched a little of people playing D&D online it seemed largely the same.

Lots of people captured by the sheer novelty of playing a character and talking in funny voices - usually in an inn, with very little happening.

They may well be having fun, but it wouldn't fly with my jaded players.

Shrieking Banshee

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My games usually follow sessions of planning followed by sessions of execution. So I find this idea that if your not killing something ever 15 seconds then its a waste, kinda insulting.

Jam The MF

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My games usually follow sessions of planning followed by sessions of execution. So I find this idea that if your not killing something ever 15 seconds then its a waste, kinda insulting.

Combat isn't the whole game; but after a few minutes of rehash, something needs to happen or at least be attempted.  Otherwise you're talking about games, without actually playing them.  My first DM wouldn't let that mess drag on.  Either the PCs do something, or the DM does something.  Something is about to happen.  The DM's time is being wasted.

"Demogorgon tires of your foolish bickering!!!"
« Last Edit: April 27, 2021, 10:12:35 PM by Jam The MF »
I need you to roll a perception check.

S'mon

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Humm. I think stuff can be unbearably boring to watch, while fun and enjoyable for the participants. I'm certainly not going to resent my players taking 15 minutes to discuss/plan, long as their PCs are in a safe location. If they're in the dungeon I'll probably roll a wandering monster check.