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Author Topic: I tried to watch an online game, and it just drug on without going anywhere....  (Read 1185 times)

Omega

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I recorded one of my Albedo sessions at GenCon and the first 20 or so min were the PCs mostly fraternizing and getting a handle on the situation at hand. After that things pick up as they got into the main action and dealt with it.

From experience often the first half-hour of a session, unless its picking up in the middle of action after a pause, will be alot of talking and puttering around.

Pretty much the first HOUR of playing Keep on the Borderlands was just talking our way into the keep. Then getting some directions, then talking to the locals to get a handle on the situation, then talking to people who might be able to assist. AND doing a little shopping before heading out and meandering across the countryside instead of heading off to the caves.

THEN the action started.

Even moreso when I was DMing Darkness Gathering campaign. The players spent alot of time just talking to people. But usually once that was out of the way things kicked into gear.

On the flip side GMing Star Frontiers things kicked off pretty quick. The PCs barely got introductions done before all hell broke loose.

I think it really depends on the players and DM. Some like to interact with the world and others just want to bash things. The type of adventure can impact too. A Call of Cthulhu or Albedo session can be mostly or even all just talking to people and no action. Or the action only comes near the end.

Very YMMV.

Shawn Driscoll

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I kept expecting the DM to roll a random encounter or something, but he wouldn't initiate anything in lieu of the players doing something.  After 20 or 30 minutes of random talking, I just gave up and exited the video.  It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion.

Now, imagine that being someone's initial exposure to D&D.  Like an episode of Seinfeld, it was a game about nothing; because nobody was actually playing the game.

Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

As a DM, how would you handle something like that?
Most players don't know how or want to role-play. Self-aware players want to know. They see things are horribly wrong at most game tables, and don't get themselves trapped in them.

Premier

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Wasn't there an old joke about the typical RPG session having 10 minutes of exciting fun spread out over four hours of play?

I thought that was supposed to be the typical Wagner opera.
Obvious troll is obvious. RIP, Bill.

Omega

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Wasn't there an old joke about the typical RPG session having 10 minutes of exciting fun spread out over four hours of play?

I thought that was supposed to be the typical Wagner opera.

There is a difference? 8)

Kyle Aaron

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Humm. I think stuff can be unbearably boring to watch, while fun and enjoyable for the participants.
This is why you should never film you and your spouse having sex.

Wrath of God

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Combat isn't the whole game; but after a few minutes of rehash, something needs to happen or at least be attempted.  Otherwise you're talking about games, without actually playing them.

If the Players discuss things in-world as their characters then SOMETHING IS HAPPENING, and freeform fireside chat are definitely part of game. That's why we call it RP-G and not just Tactical Skirmish RPG as pesky Forged in the Dark demons would like to see D&D and consortes.

VengerSatanis

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I kept expecting the DM to roll a random encounter or something, but he wouldn't initiate anything in lieu of the players doing something.  After 20 or 30 minutes of random talking, I just gave up and exited the video.  It was just a conversation about a game that wasn't actually in motion.

Now, imagine that being someone's initial exposure to D&D.  Like an episode of Seinfeld, it was a game about nothing; because nobody was actually playing the game.

Remembering, rehashing, discussing, planning, whatever; but no actual gameplay.

As a DM, how would you handle something like that?

But in an episode of Seinfeld, that "nothing" is actually something.  What you watched was paint drying - boring and lame.  I've had the same experiences.  It's painful to watch.  Even the high production value shows are fairly bad.

robh

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.......If the Players discuss things in-world as their characters then SOMETHING IS HAPPENING, and freeform fireside chat are definitely part of game.......

Yeah, the fucking boring part.

Wrath of God

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Yeah, the fucking boring part.

Definitely disagree. Team bickering is basically much more interesting thank killing dragons and saving princesses :P

Kyle Aaron

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Team bickering is why Gygax invented the wandering monster check. A lot of GMs, especially the ones filming their games, don't understand the importance of keeping things moving.

Jam The MF

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Team bickering is why Gygax invented the wandering monster check. A lot of GMs, especially the ones filming their games, don't understand the importance of keeping things moving.


There it is.  Someone who understands.
I need you to roll a perception check.

Shawn Driscoll

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Nearly all recorded games are Mother, May I sessions.

Omega

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Nearly all recorded games are Mother, May I sessions.

Given time you storygamers will put an end to that Im sure. Along with those nasty hated RPGs.

Nephil

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Nearly all recorded games are Mother, May I sessions.

Amusing how someone calling themselves a "role-playing purist" wants more rules to interfere with a session. Storygaming is a misnomer, if what they want is for everything to have mechanics.

Omega

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Only the players can tell the story, oops, sorry, The Fiction...
The DM, if one is even allowed, it just a leashed vend bot.