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Author Topic: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms  (Read 2303 times)

Samsquantch

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #30 on: March 28, 2021, 04:22:03 PM »
[quote author=Samsquantch link=topic=43312.msg1167000#msg1167000


You are so correct Yabaziou.
I was once accosted by a slovenly trull in 2019 and had to resort to calling her a more PC name whilst refusing her persistent advances. I used the encounter as an introduction of the table to my group during the next day's gaming session. After having the slovenly trull accost the paladin and giving myself a good chuckle...

I am so pleased to read this !!!
[/quote]

Glad to hear it!
My players are all new to RPG's and started with 5e. I've been gaming since 79 so I love introducing old school stuff to them at every opportunity.

Tiocfaidh ár lá

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #31 on: March 28, 2021, 06:23:46 PM »
Where there are harlots there are often police. An old term for the constabulary, which I do use myself, is the Gathers. So called because they can gather you up during the course of their enquiries. Hence the phrase, the gathers have spun my drum - the police have searched my abode.

Samsquantch

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #32 on: March 28, 2021, 06:25:43 PM »
Where there are harlots there are often police. An old term for the constabulary, which I do use myself, is the Gathers. So called because they can gather you up during the course of their enquiries. Hence the phrase, the gathers have spun my drum - the police have searched my abode.

That's cool! I've never heard that one before.

Libramarian

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #33 on: March 28, 2021, 06:47:16 PM »
I'm fond of "mooncalf" as a simultaneously archaic and euphemistic substitution for "retard".
And "tyro" for "newb".

Ghostmaker

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2021, 10:31:56 AM »
I've heard tyro before as a synonym for newbie, but damned if I can remember the origin.

Speaking of dams, ever hear the phrase 'not worth a tinker's dam'? Continuing on the stuff about tinkers, the 'dam' was a clay patch put into place over a hole in a pan. Molten tin was then applied to the other side to form the proper patch, and then the clay was knocked off. Obviously, not worth anything -- hence the phrase.

American hobos and tramps tend to be a very curious, very different breed from Roma/travelers. I remember hearing somewhere -- can't recall where -- that most hobos loathe traveler bands and avoid them like the plague.

Lurkndog

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #35 on: March 29, 2021, 10:53:35 AM »
I have heard it presented like that, but honestly? I don’t believe this is true. The history of geisha is intermingled with prostitution from the start, even when some of them were men. It’s become an art form so they try to give it a cleaner image. In a society with mores like old Japan, a woman who entertains men in private probably provided sexual acts as well, even if they may have been much more exclusive than common prostitutes.
As I understand it, geisha might work in the red light district, but not as prostitutes.

Think of a bartender at a strip club, or a dealer in a casino. There might be stuff going on, but not everyone is a person of negotiable virtue, and you can get yourself kicked out if you try to cross that line.

Lynn

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2021, 01:26:26 PM »
I have heard it presented like that, but honestly? I don’t believe this is true. The history of geisha is intermingled with prostitution from the start, even when some of them were men. It’s become an art form so they try to give it a cleaner image. In a society with mores like old Japan, a woman who entertains men in private probably provided sexual acts as well, even if they may have been much more exclusive than common prostitutes.
It is more complicated than that because of social class.

Geisha are interwined with the 'floating world' of entertainment, and they were of a higher level then other types of performer.
Lynn Fredricks
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Lurkndog

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #37 on: May 24, 2021, 08:50:47 AM »
I've heard tyro before as a synonym for newbie, but damned if I can remember the origin.

I'm pretty sure I've read that term in Robert A. Heinlein sci fi books.

According to Merriam-Webster, it comes from the latin tiro, meaning a young soldier or new recruit.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2021, 08:56:49 AM by Lurkndog »

Jam The MF

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #38 on: May 24, 2021, 02:30:37 PM »
Hm? Never mind that.
What we need is an Advanced Harlot Table, with more names  ;D
How about:
Honest hooker
Glamorous geisha
For a modern setting: carefree call-girl


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I need you to roll a perception check.

Bren

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2021, 04:01:33 PM »
And this does not even get into local slang or local terms for things. My aunt used the term holler to refer to a swampy valley nearby where she grew up for example.
My grandfather called the hollow where he dumped dead leaves, grass clippings, and clinkers from the coal furnace "the dingle." He emigrated to the US from the north of Ireland.
Calling that the dingle is kind of weird in a way, since the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland is where his wife, my grandmother, was from.
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Omega

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2021, 09:44:47 PM »
I've heard tyro before as a synonym for newbie, but damned if I can remember the origin.

I'm pretty sure I've read that term in Robert A. Heinlein sci fi books.

According to Merriam-Webster, it comes from the latin tiro, meaning a young soldier or new recruit.

I've seen Tyro used in a few different things. Usually in ref to someone younger, unseasoned etc. So fits the above definition. Also heard it used to refer to younger thugs, ruffians, carousers, etc.

Plays, books, even comics and movies. Have not seen it used in a long time though.

Omega

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #41 on: May 24, 2021, 09:54:40 PM »
My grandfather called the hollow where he dumped dead leaves, grass clippings, and clinkers from the coal furnace "the dingle." He emigrated to the US from the north of Ireland.
Calling that the dingle is kind of weird in a way, since the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland is where his wife, my grandmother, was from.

I've heard dingle used before. But never knew what it was really referring to other than some sort of geography.

Bren

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #42 on: May 25, 2021, 03:31:28 PM »
I've heard dingle used before. But never knew what it was really referring to other than some sort of geography.
Dell would be another word for it.
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ScytheSong

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #43 on: May 26, 2021, 12:49:45 PM »
I've heard dingle used before. But never knew what it was really referring to other than some sort of geography.
Dell would be another word for it.

My family used the two words differently -- a dell could have water running out of (or through) it, a dingle was dished so that it couldn't.

Omega

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Re: Harlot Tables and Archaic Terms
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2021, 12:49:22 AM »
Dell was fairly common where I grew up. The ones I know of were all wooded depressions of some sort.

And heres a weird one. Where moved to in the 90s there was a place locally called Grimpen Mire that heard of on the radio but never saw. But apparently that is not a real location as its a fictional place in Hound of the Baskervilles?