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Author Topic: Game Table Atmosphere  (Read 1165 times)

rgrove0172

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Game Table Atmosphere
« on: August 18, 2016, 12:05:18 PM »
How would rate the atmosphere surrounding your game table during a session on the following scale? Elaborate please

1 = Quiet, contemplative, serious, low voices, - think some old English gentleman with smoking jackets and brandy muttering over their cigars.

10 = Loud, frolicking, jovial, side bar conversations, perpetual humorous injections - think 13 year olds slinging pizza and fart jokes

Is there a difference between the rating you gave your own group and the rating you wish you could give? Why?

K Peterson

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Game Table Atmosphere
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2016, 01:03:14 PM »
Maybe a 3 or a 4? Between those two extremes.

I run a lot of Call of Cthulhu, so a level of seriousness is required at the table to maintain the mood of play. But it's not all stiff and staid; there is always some humor about the crazy situations that occur in play. There are times, as a Keeper, when I can't stop smiling because of the actions that the investigators take. It can be damned entertaining.

I play in another group which would probably rate closer to an 8 on that scale. There can be a lot of distractions, but it still works for the types of campaigns that are run. It's a different dynamic than the campaigns I run.

crkrueger

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Game Table Atmosphere
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2016, 01:26:34 PM »
My group is pretty heavy into roleplaying, so there's not a whole lot of fart jokes, Monty Python quotes, etc, not even when the PCs are partying at a Tavern, it tends to stay IC.

There's also not a whole lot of digressions into pop culture, current events, etc...  that happens during breaks, meals or the rest of the time we see each other when we haven't gotten together for the specific purpose of roleplaying.

I wouldn't classify it as quiet either.  Sneaking into someplace, standing in court before a King, sure pretty quiet.  Full-blown battle, drinking at an Inn, heated discussions between PCs - pretty loud.

The PCs set the tone, the players don't have a "default mode" regardless of what's happening at the table.
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rgrove0172

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Game Table Atmosphere
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2016, 01:36:40 PM »
The games Ive run have always been in the 2-4 range, just about where I like them. Occasionally a player group would stretch it above 5 and I tolerated it but didn't like it. Im big on setting the scene around the table, lighting and atmosphere, props etc. I suppose I take it too seriously.

I recall the first convention game I went to where the entire hall was filled with tables at 7+. I was totally blown away that people played that way. They had a blast obviously but I wanted to run screaming to my room!

Shawn Driscoll

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Game Table Atmosphere
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2016, 01:50:14 PM »
7. About the action/noise level of a '60s Star Trek episode. I refuse to add jokers/clowns at the table.

Battle Mad Ronin

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« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2016, 02:15:09 PM »
I'm gonna be an asshole and say 5, square in the middle.

We do like to screw around, and as the GM I'm more often on the instigating side than I should be.

On the other hand we do have a some very serious moments. When people have 'laughed it out' we can get very intense. There has been more than one moment of true suspense over the last few sessions, despite mostly being concerned with 'Orange is the New Black' parodies and comical, castrated yogis.

Omega

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« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2016, 04:03:01 PM »
Long moments of contemplation punctuated by much shouting.

aheh.

With the group I DM for it goes in waves. Theres stretches where they are more thoughtfull and serious, and stretches where they are boisterous and loud. This tends to map to the moments of action, interaction, or just plain weird that occurs and the locale and situation.

Harlock

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« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2016, 07:03:46 PM »
With my current group it's 4 - 5ish. We get all of the poop jokes and catching up out of our system before we start back into the campaign.
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Exploderwizard

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« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2016, 07:06:15 PM »
Not so many fart jokes but lots of actual farts. The atmosphere at times is downright unbearable.
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The Butcher

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« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2016, 07:34:27 PM »
Usually a 7 or 8, though I can get them to crank it down to as low as a 3 or 4. It really depends on who's running and what game. Or as high as 9 or 10 for a beer-and-pretzels game.

Brand55

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« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2016, 07:38:29 PM »
My group probably ranges from 5 to 8 depending on what we're doing. We tend to not be very serious but that can change at times if we're playing later at night or doing something more serious. I'd probably prefer they kept things a little more serious overall (they'd certainly get a lot more accomplished if they didn't get constantly sidetracked by every passing squirrel), but as long as everyone is having fun I can't complain.

Old One Eye

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« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2016, 07:48:18 PM »
In game, about a 2 or 3.  Not going to be fart monsters or anything like that.  (With the rare exception of specifically playing a joke game like Paranoia.)

Out of game, maybe an 8.  No problem with a Monty Python joke in my parts.

Spinachcat

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« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2016, 08:04:25 PM »
Depends on the genre.

FOR ME, horror RPGs do better at the lower end of the noise scale, while Supers/Cinematic Action do better at the higher end.

I have played with lots of 7+ groups, and I enjoy them in their context.

Also, I think for there to be a serious discussion about this topic (which is a good one), I think we need definitions for 3 / 5 / 7 so we can gauge better what we are each meaning by them.

Harlock

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« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2016, 08:41:52 PM »
Quote from: Spinachcat;913835
Depends on the genre.

FOR ME, horror RPGs do better at the lower end of the noise scale, while Supers/Cinematic Action do better at the higher end.

I have played with lots of 7+ groups, and I enjoy them in their context.

Also, I think for there to be a serious discussion about this topic (which is a good one), I think we need definitions for 3 / 5 / 7 so we can gauge better what we are each meaning by them.

That's something I didn't take into consideration! Style of game can greatly affect the general ambiance and atmosphere of a game. A supers game in the style of say, Spider-Man with wisecracking heroes and over the top threats and monologues from the villain should be loud and a little outrageous. Likewise, a Blazing Saddles game should have fart and penis jokes (and has anyone run a Blazing Saddles style Boot Hill or Deadlands game?). Really, considering every game has it's own mood, this changes things quite a bit.
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Bren

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Game Table Atmosphere
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2016, 09:00:40 PM »
Quote from: Harlock;913849
That's something I didn't take into consideration! Style of game can greatly affect the general ambiance and atmosphere of a game.
Certainly the scenario where everyone was a character in a silent movie was a lot less boisterous than one where they were characters in a Luchadors meet Rubber aliens meet SS Vixens movie. We played that one back in the mid 1990s, which was way before Jack Black or mainstream culture got Luchadores. The players did like the inclusion of a couple of actual Luchador masks.
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