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Author Topic: This thread is CLOSED cause nobody won’t talk to me more nicer (D&D thieves)  (Read 2807 times)

Pat

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In 1e, the thief profession is described as not dishonorable, but isn’t honorable, either. A couple of paragraphs down, it limits the alignment of the thief to neutral or evil (a thief can be lawful or good, but not lawful good). It says that the primary thief functions—pickpocketing, picklocketing, trap administration, moving about noiselessly, and hiding in shadows—are all self-explanatory. Then, the text helpfully explains these activities. The thief rounds out his functions with listening to doors, climbing surfaces—both up AND down—and attacking people when they turn their backs to the thief.
Did you look through the DMG? There's a whole section giving more detail on thief abilities.

D&D 6th edition: sixth edition dungeons and dragons keeps a lot of the core elements of the thief, but adds some very interesting twists that I think will please fans of the class, but I am not going to spoil those for you. You will just have to wait.
A looting skill?

GeekyBugle

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In 1e, the thief profession is described as not dishonorable, but isn’t honorable, either. A couple of paragraphs down, it limits the alignment of the thief to neutral or evil (a thief can be lawful or good, but not lawful good). It says that the primary thief functions—pickpocketing, picklocketing, trap administration, moving about noiselessly, and hiding in shadows—are all self-explanatory. Then, the text helpfully explains these activities. The thief rounds out his functions with listening to doors, climbing surfaces—both up AND down—and attacking people when they turn their backs to the thief.
Did you look through the DMG? There's a whole section giving more detail on thief abilities.

D&D 6th edition: sixth edition dungeons and dragons keeps a lot of the core elements of the thief, but adds some very interesting twists that I think will please fans of the class, but I am not going to spoil those for you. You will just have to wait.
A looting skill?

Nah, the skill to tax people.
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Melichor

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It will be a social media grifting skill.

DocJones

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There's only one class in  Thieves Guild  by GameLords.
Because "Sometimes it's more fun to play the bad guys"

Wntrlnd

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Just reminded of that Gandalf (wizard) hired Bilbo to the party of dwarves (all fighters? Balin would probably be the one who fits "cleric" best, being the wisest of the dwarves, having a high perception and fearless) for the position of "burglar".

I know the younger me was very confused as to why Gandalf would call his friend basically a criminal and how what amounted to what looked to me a upper class british gentleman could be skilled in breaking and entering.

"Burglar" would be someone who break in and take things. Being stealthy and skilled in entering places they're not supposed to be.
In a game of Shadowrun or modern/science fiction that would be the Infiltrator, intrusion specialist, Security breacher or whatever that has a much nicer sounding name, but to modern to be used in a D&D game.

You need something more old fashioned named, and "thief" simply fits.


AtomicPope

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Reading through the comments reminds me of Bilbo's argument with Thorin about being called "Burglar."  By the end of it he was a back-stabbing Thief and Burglar.

I really miss the AD&D titles.