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Author Topic: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?  (Read 1430 times)

SHARK

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2021, 10:33:56 PM »
Greetings!

Indeed, make the tribal people of the Isle of Dread Polynesian-like people. Make some faction of them savages, cannibals, thorough villains, and make another faction that are of Good alignment, and potential allies for the Player Characters. Embrace tribes of monstrous humanoids, lots of dinosaurs, giant insects, and various weird monsters!

Add in some ancient ruins, a few demonologists and bands of evil reptilian humanoids, too. There's also some room for a few rival bands of evil adventurers as well.

Fantastic environment!

Semper Fidelis,

SHARK
"It is the Marine Corps that will strip away the façade so easily confused with self. It is the Corps that will offer the pain needed to buy the truth. And at last, each will own the privilege of looking inside himself  to discover what truly resides there. Comfort is an illusion. A false security bred from familiar things and familiar ways. It narrows the mind. Weakens the body. And robs the soul of spirit and determination. Comfort is neither welcome nor tolerated here."

"Courage is not the absence of fear, but is doing what you have to, in spite of the fear."
"Let Death and Fire Be Their Portion!"
"Delenda Est Parthia!"

rickss

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2021, 01:33:57 AM »
Curious if anyone has run it semi recently and how they did it.
I ran it straight that way. It's kinda nice to not have a direct cultural theft, and instead it be a blend of things. Enough that you get the individual references, but different enough that they're different. I mean, it's not a like a culture dealing with dinosaurs and pirates makes sense anyway :-)

A couple of Isle of Dread suggestions.
Dungeon #114. Torrents of Dread
Replace/supplement  the not fleshed out lost city with B4 The Lost City.

Eirikrautha

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2021, 10:06:07 PM »
One thing that I find striking/amusing in the sections on Wandering Monsters:

BECMI - hope the party doesn't trigger something too big.  Sucks to be them.
5e - several pages of algebra/entreaties to 'balance' a wandering encounter.
As long as the PCs know that not every encounter requires combat (using stealth to get past a T-Rex might be the best choice for a L3 party,  for example), an encounter above their pay grade is fine.
There's almost always one or two characters in a typical party that are terrible at stealth, so it only becomes an option if the party is designed for it from the beginning...or if they are willing to accept the loss of the heavily armored clankers.
So they hide and don't move.  Or the stealthy characters create a noisy distraction, draw it away, and then stealth away.  It's called "creativity," and D&D thrives on it.  Apparently you're one of those "Oh, no!  I have a low score on my stealth, and all I can do is roll dice and compare to my sheet."  Get good...

Omega

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2021, 01:19:43 AM »
Curious if anyone has run it semi recently and how they did it.
I ran it straight that way. It's kinda nice to not have a direct cultural theft,

cultural... theft...

uh huh. Sorry. We have enough applicants for village idiot as is. Please get in line.

HappyDaze

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2021, 02:19:35 AM »
One thing that I find striking/amusing in the sections on Wandering Monsters:

BECMI - hope the party doesn't trigger something too big.  Sucks to be them.
5e - several pages of algebra/entreaties to 'balance' a wandering encounter.
As long as the PCs know that not every encounter requires combat (using stealth to get past a T-Rex might be the best choice for a L3 party,  for example), an encounter above their pay grade is fine.
There's almost always one or two characters in a typical party that are terrible at stealth, so it only becomes an option if the party is designed for it from the beginning...or if they are willing to accept the loss of the heavily armored clankers.
So they hide and don't move.  Or the stealthy characters create a noisy distraction, draw it away, and then stealth away.  It's called "creativity," and D&D thrives on it.  Apparently you're one of those "Oh, no!  I have a low score on my stealth, and all I can do is roll dice and compare to my sheet."  Get good...
Or your creativity just fails. Sometimes that happens too. But you're one of those that believes your idiot plans will always work because your GM lets you win. Get better...

Eirikrautha

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2021, 02:55:16 PM »
One thing that I find striking/amusing in the sections on Wandering Monsters:

BECMI - hope the party doesn't trigger something too big.  Sucks to be them.
5e - several pages of algebra/entreaties to 'balance' a wandering encounter.
As long as the PCs know that not every encounter requires combat (using stealth to get past a T-Rex might be the best choice for a L3 party,  for example), an encounter above their pay grade is fine.
There's almost always one or two characters in a typical party that are terrible at stealth, so it only becomes an option if the party is designed for it from the beginning...or if they are willing to accept the loss of the heavily armored clankers.
So they hide and don't move.  Or the stealthy characters create a noisy distraction, draw it away, and then stealth away.  It's called "creativity," and D&D thrives on it.  Apparently you're one of those "Oh, no!  I have a low score on my stealth, and all I can do is roll dice and compare to my sheet."  Get good...
Or your creativity just fails. Sometimes that happens too. But you're one of those that believes your idiot plans will always work because your GM lets you win. Get better...
LOL!  Cry more.  Your games must suck...

HappyDaze

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2021, 04:12:14 PM »
One thing that I find striking/amusing in the sections on Wandering Monsters:

BECMI - hope the party doesn't trigger something too big.  Sucks to be them.
5e - several pages of algebra/entreaties to 'balance' a wandering encounter.
As long as the PCs know that not every encounter requires combat (using stealth to get past a T-Rex might be the best choice for a L3 party,  for example), an encounter above their pay grade is fine.
There's almost always one or two characters in a typical party that are terrible at stealth, so it only becomes an option if the party is designed for it from the beginning...or if they are willing to accept the loss of the heavily armored clankers.
So they hide and don't move.  Or the stealthy characters create a noisy distraction, draw it away, and then stealth away.  It's called "creativity," and D&D thrives on it.  Apparently you're one of those "Oh, no!  I have a low score on my stealth, and all I can do is roll dice and compare to my sheet."  Get good...
Or your creativity just fails. Sometimes that happens too. But you're one of those that believes your idiot plans will always work because your GM lets you win. Get better...
LOL!  Cry more.  Your games must suck...
That the best you've got? You're opinions matter not to me because you're an irrelevant piece of shit stuck to the toilet bowl and in need of being flushed.

Arnwolf666

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Re: Who exactly lives on the Isle of dread?
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2021, 07:01:20 PM »
One thing that I find striking/amusing in the sections on Wandering Monsters:

BECMI - hope the party doesn't trigger something too big.  Sucks to be them.
5e - several pages of algebra/entreaties to 'balance' a wandering encounter.
As long as the PCs know that not every encounter requires combat (using stealth to get past a T-Rex might be the best choice for a L3 party,  for example), an encounter above their pay grade is fine.
There's almost always one or two characters in a typical party that are terrible at stealth, so it only becomes an option if the party is designed for it from the beginning...or if they are willing to accept the loss of the heavily armored clankers.
So they hide and don't move.  Or the stealthy characters create a noisy distraction, draw it away, and then stealth away.  It's called "creativity," and D&D thrives on it.  Apparently you're one of those "Oh, no!  I have a low score on my stealth, and all I can do is roll dice and compare to my sheet."  Get good...

Add ninja’s and a crashed illithid space ship and you have the perfect adventure.