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D&D Players: Why you might like Savage Worlds

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Chainsaw Surgeon:

--- Quote from: tenbones on October 11, 2021, 11:42:08 AM ---

Sub-Systems Galore -  If you're the king of GM that doesn't want to get mired down in lots of 'fiddly' which prevents you from doing scenes like chases, mass-combat, capital-ship/ship-scale combat, or even social "combat" like canvasing a neighborhood/city for info gathering, for fear of bogging the game down, Savage Worlds has you covered. They have little sub-systems you can use to emulate nearly any scenario in a fun manner to execute these kinds of scenes complete with random wrench-throwing into the mix that allows the PC's to do really heroic (or knuckletightening) antics. They're excellent for drawing in those players that need a little goosing to get their RP wheels turning, and they're open enough to let veteran players really fly off the leash and go for it. And they're all designed to be tweaked up/down/sideways to allow you to customize them specifically to your table's needs. Mass Combat in particular has been a blast for my games. It lets PC's shine while actually allowing for nearly any and every dramatic possibility (including random elements) to give you the feel of a true ebb/flow of combat. This is supported with in-game Skills and Edges that can make such encounters really give the PC's an advantage, while reinforcing their wheelhouse (yes, a Fighter that leads an actual army against their enemies with skills that back it up!).

All of these systems can seamlessly flow between the sub-system and normal play without dropping a beat. So you could have the battles raging on different fronts, while one or more PC's have single combat against real opponents (which has impact on the enemy forces if their leaders drop).


--- End quote ---

These sub-systems also can handle the other 'pillars' of play that the current crop of DnD players clamor for.  Exploration: Check.  Puzzles and Traps: Check.  Social: Check.   

oggsmash:
 I watched a video a few years ago about the SW creator and his point of view I found to be very similar to mine.   I remember specifically one of the points he made, was that when he played Dungeons and dragons (I can not remember if he was a 1st or 2nd edition player) that once his character got a certain AC, he was essentially invulnerable to attacks from lower end creatures, like a horde of zombies for example.  I like that SW has rules where even if you are legendary status, you have some level of concern when you wade into a horde of enemies, BUT you also have edges and game mechanics than can allow that legendary character to look legendary in a horde.   

    I think there are some points where it can bend a bit in play, but for a game that is default pulp, and can be tweaked to be more on the 4 color comics scale, or back over to grim and gritty fairly easily, Savage Worlds is very, very hard to beat with regard to a system.   I think the other thing they do very, very well, much better than the producers of other Universal rules systems, is tweaking their rules and making specific settings within the frameworks of their rules.   They can emulate a more rigid class structure, or a very open ended character progression.   Other systems can do this, but IMO do no make specific settings and situations where the work is done, essentially producing a full game in one package.   Savage Rifts and now Savage Pathfinder are the most recent examples of this, and I think there may be a chance for Pinnacle to really rise in the market share over the next few years.   They just need to fund a few good looking people with nice voices to play their game on a huge youtube or twitch channel (because I honestly think that has had more to do with D&D rising than anything else).

Godsmonkey:

--- Quote from: oggsmash on October 13, 2021, 09:27:57 AM --- I watched a video a few years ago about the SW creator and his point of view I found to be very similar to mine.   I remember specifically one of the points he made, was that when he played Dungeons and dragons (I can not remember if he was a 1st or 2nd edition player) that once his character got a certain AC, he was essentially invulnerable to attacks from lower end creatures, like a horde of zombies for example.  I like that SW has rules where even if you are legendary status, you have some level of concern when you wade into a horde of enemies, BUT you also have edges and game mechanics than can allow that legendary character to look legendary in a horde.   

    I think there are some points where it can bend a bit in play, but for a game that is default pulp, and can be tweaked to be more on the 4 color comics scale, or back over to grim and gritty fairly easily, Savage Worlds is very, very hard to beat with regard to a system.   I think the other thing they do very, very well, much better than the producers of other Universal rules systems, is tweaking their rules and making specific settings within the frameworks of their rules.   They can emulate a more rigid class structure, or a very open ended character progression.   Other systems can do this, but IMO do no make specific settings and situations where the work is done, essentially producing a full game in one package.   Savage Rifts and now Savage Pathfinder are the most recent examples of this, and I think there may be a chance for Pinnacle to really rise in the market share over the next few years.   They just need to fund a few good looking people with nice voices to play their game on a huge youtube or twitch channel (because I honestly think that has had more to do with D&D rising than anything else).

--- End quote ---

In late 2019, Critical role did a 3 or 4 part "Undeadwood" game featuring Savage Worlds version of Deadland. Each episode got over a million views. I wonder if there was a bump in sales after?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEIGOY6WDoA

oggsmash:

--- Quote from: Godsmonkey on October 13, 2021, 10:04:04 AM ---
--- Quote from: oggsmash on October 13, 2021, 09:27:57 AM --- I watched a video a few years ago about the SW creator and his point of view I found to be very similar to mine.   I remember specifically one of the points he made, was that when he played Dungeons and dragons (I can not remember if he was a 1st or 2nd edition player) that once his character got a certain AC, he was essentially invulnerable to attacks from lower end creatures, like a horde of zombies for example.  I like that SW has rules where even if you are legendary status, you have some level of concern when you wade into a horde of enemies, BUT you also have edges and game mechanics than can allow that legendary character to look legendary in a horde.   

    I think there are some points where it can bend a bit in play, but for a game that is default pulp, and can be tweaked to be more on the 4 color comics scale, or back over to grim and gritty fairly easily, Savage Worlds is very, very hard to beat with regard to a system.   I think the other thing they do very, very well, much better than the producers of other Universal rules systems, is tweaking their rules and making specific settings within the frameworks of their rules.   They can emulate a more rigid class structure, or a very open ended character progression.   Other systems can do this, but IMO do no make specific settings and situations where the work is done, essentially producing a full game in one package.   Savage Rifts and now Savage Pathfinder are the most recent examples of this, and I think there may be a chance for Pinnacle to really rise in the market share over the next few years.   They just need to fund a few good looking people with nice voices to play their game on a huge youtube or twitch channel (because I honestly think that has had more to do with D&D rising than anything else).

--- End quote ---

In late 2019, Critical role did a 3 or 4 part "Undeadwood" game featuring Savage Worlds version of Deadland. Each episode got over a million views. I wonder if there was a bump in sales after?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEIGOY6WDoA

--- End quote ---

  I would think it takes a bit longer to get that sales needle moving, as I think the new purveyors of ads feel a customer needs to see one somewhere between 16-25 times to take action (thanks to decades of being bombarded from all sides in all ways by sales ads from all senses) but I really have no idea.   

Shrieking Banshee:
I think pinnacle is doing the right thing with SW by trying to get these licenses. But its a tricky act because the more public the license is, the more money it has to make and if it asks for too much it will backfire like Genysis and star wars.

Thats why I think they made Savage Pathfinder before a fantasy companion.

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