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Author Topic: Combat Wheelchairs and how to make them work in medieval settings.  (Read 4068 times)

Omega

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Combat Wheelchairs and how to make them work in medieval settings.
« Reply #105 on: August 28, 2020, 04:24:21 am »
I can see a wheelchair as being a temporary solution for an adventurer that has lost the ability to walk but still wants to adventure. Something that is simple and affordable till they can either find a cure or get a better conveyance. Its not a great solution. But its whats on hand for now and finding better could be the seed of a quest, or side quest.

I mean really. D&D is all about finding new ways to hammer square pegs into round holes and making lemonade from this chest of lemons you just found.

Franky

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Combat Wheelchairs and how to make them work in medieval settings.
« Reply #106 on: August 28, 2020, 10:47:53 pm »
Quote from: Stephen Tannhauser;1144569
Doing my usual blithe miss-the-point-completely gig, it occurs to me that you could make a fantastic RPG or literary hero out of a tragically paralyzed warrior given a magical suit of armour that allowed him to walk and fight again -- a suit of metal black as night, glinting blood red at the joints, animated by a dark supernatural force that demands its price from the wearer not in blood, but in tiny bits of soul and heart, wearing away one's humanity bit by bit . . . a suit that mysteriously, without warning, locks up in total immobility whenever the wearer comes too near a church, or a powerful cleric of Good, and which whispers . . . thoughts . . . to the wearer's mind whenever alone with innocents . . . .

As GURPS has pointed out in every edition, a disadvantage that isn't a disadvantage isn't worth anything. If it has a dramatic or rule relevance to the game, the most you can do is change how it disadvantages the PC, not the fact that it does.
 This Artifact (in the original D&D sense) needs a name and write-up.  Seriously.

Omega

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Combat Wheelchairs and how to make them work in medieval settings.
« Reply #107 on: August 29, 2020, 09:57:02 am »
This is part of why I leave out superhero settings and comics from these discussions as theres been ALOT of heroes and heroines going quite far back that were in one form or another disabled. But have some workaround.

The original Hourman is a good example. Someone who was blinded. But uses a serum that allows him to see. But only in darkness. Others being Daredevil and the Shade. Its also popped up at least twice in live action superhero shows. Personal favourite is Exo-Man about a scientist who is paralyzed from the legs down and unable to walk. And uses a power armour suit to walk. The other notable being Mantis. And since it pretty much is a superhero show. The Six-Million dollar Man series is another good example. Moreso in the original books. Another to a leser degree being Night Man who after an accident gains night vision, but much like Hourman is practically blinded in daylight. And numerous others. Silhouette from New Warriors is another paraplegic who gets about via crutches and teleport powers.

RPGPundit

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Re: Combat Wheelchairs and how to make them work in medieval settings.
« Reply #108 on: September 05, 2020, 03:12:48 pm »


The original Hourman is a good example. Someone who was blinded. But uses a serum that allows him to see. But only in darkness.


That wasn't Hourman (though Hourman was arguably a drug addict).
The blind superhero was Dr. Mid-Nite.  It wasn't a serum, if I recall, it was the same accident that made him blind gave him nightvision. In any situation where there's light he needs goggles to see.
When you mention Daredevil you're probably thinking of the Silver-Age Marvel Daredevil who was of course blind but had super-senses that made up for it.
But a better example might be the Golden Age Daredevil, who was a mute.



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Svenhelgrim

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Re: Combat Wheelchairs and how to make them work in medieval settings.
« Reply #109 on: September 06, 2020, 10:45:31 am »

You know that in ADnD they had a spell called Tensers Floating Disk?  But somehow the real problem is making a Fantasy Wheelchair.


This!


It’s a level 1 spell, can carry 500 lbs, and lasts for 1 hour.  Plus it is a ritual so it won’t eat up a spell slot if you take the 10 mins to cast it.

Omega

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Re: Combat Wheelchairs and how to make them work in medieval settings.
« Reply #110 on: September 06, 2020, 09:09:46 pm »


The original Hourman is a good example. Someone who was blinded. But uses a serum that allows him to see. But only in darkness.


That wasn't Hourman (though Hourman was arguably a drug addict).
The blind superhero was Dr. Mid-Nite.  It wasn't a serum, if I recall, it was the same accident that made him blind gave him nightvision. In any situation where there's light he needs goggles to see.
Right. Meant Mid-Night.