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Author Topic: 5e and the state of the industry  (Read 894 times)

Eric Diaz

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Re: 5e and the state of the industry
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2021, 09:00:27 PM »
I'm not sure.

I played many different games during the 4e era, but now I'm playing a lot of 5e (well, heavily house-ruiled since it's become too bloated for me).

I write reviews, etc., and 5e draws A LOT of attention when compared to different games.

A decent edition of D&D is a double-edged sword, it seems...
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Gameogre

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Re: 5e and the state of the industry
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2021, 11:54:36 AM »
Loved 5E at the start. Thought it was old school enough. After DMing it for years. I see now that it isn't...at all. It has enough of the surface dressing of Old School games that I didn't notice the bad veins running all through it.

My house rules for it ended up being a book.

That's when I realized it would be better and more core to the rules system to just use Old School essentials and a half a dozen house rules than the monstrosity I was trying to work with.

It's still a very deductive and flashy edition though that I struggle to put down and walk away from. It's the Drug Dealer Edition. Don't worry about that stuff man, rules don't make the game. Just play me. Look ay all my awesome adventure paths. Players will hound you if you pick me, that's right inspiration ain't so bad, low math is a feature..who needs AC...people don't like to miss anyway......here try this new E-tool.........

robh

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Re: 5e and the state of the industry
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2021, 12:33:11 PM »
I'm quite sure I've seen at least Warhammer and Cthulhu games on Roll20 with implemented skills and challenges resolved, so I guess there is more to that.
Besides it's in best interest of any VTT to have more options than just D&D.

I have watched YouTube videos of Forbidden Lands games using Roll20, sadly due to the poor GM they are not a great advertisement for the game but the software seems to work well enough.


Edit: I've seen some of this spilling over into live games.  I've seen several GMs run 5e by printing out battlemap size maps of dungeons, cutting them up and progressively laying them out as the party move around with the miniatures never leaving the table.


You say that like it's a bad thing  ;)
I am a huge fan of figures on the table for RPGs but prefer one of the modular 2.5D or 3D dungeon terrain sets to maps.

Samsquantch

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Re: 5e and the state of the industry
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2021, 12:48:50 PM »

Edit: I've seen some of this spilling over into live games.  I've seen several GMs run 5e by printing out battlemap size maps of dungeons, cutting them up and progressively laying them out as the party move around with the miniatures never leaving the table.


You say that like it's a bad thing  ;)
I am a huge fan of figures on the table for RPGs but prefer one of the modular 2.5D or 3D dungeon terrain sets to maps.

And that is how I came to own three 3d printers... I couldn't justify buying Dwarven Forge stuff anymore.

Philotomy Jurament

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Re: 5e and the state of the industry
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2021, 07:47:43 PM »
For as long as I've been paying attention to RPGs, the conventional wisdom has been "As D&D goes, so goes the industry". When D&D is thriving, the rest of the RPG sector does well, and when D&D slumps, so does everyone else.

Yeah, I dunno. It's that thing about correlation and causation. D&D has always been the biggest dog in the RPG industry. So is it the success of D&D that's pulling along other RPGs in the industry, or is it just that when the industry as a whole is doing well D&D (as the big dog) does very well, too? Or some mix of the two? And then there's the distinction between the industry and the hobby. They're related, of course, but not exactly the same thing.

Personally, I don't worry about "the industry." I buy the games and supplements I enjoy playing, participate in my corner of the hobby, and I figure the rest of it will work out however it's going to work out.
That rug really tied the room together, man.

horsesoldier

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Re: 5e and the state of the industry
« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2021, 02:10:41 PM »
I'm quite sure I've seen at least Warhammer and Cthulhu games on Roll20 with implemented skills and challenges resolved, so I guess there is more to that.
Besides it's in best interest of any VTT to have more options than just D&D.
It's the same issue though.  VTTs greatly constrict the range of games that can make an impact, due to their level of support.

And it's a vicious circle because only games that have a large enough group of players will get significant support.

I playing Traveller on Foundry and it's being developed by volunteers. Rules implementation is very spotty. The degree to which a game is supported will straight up decide what system I run with; I don't want to deal with poorly coded frustration. And this leads to a prevalence of rules simple games. Numbers + monetization will be the cure, but some systems will never get developed due to complexity/obscurity.

robh

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Re: 5e and the state of the industry
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2021, 05:14:56 PM »
According to the Fantasy Grounds report, D&D 5e accounts for 71% of the use of their platform, with Pathfinder and Savage Worlds taking another 16% between them.
https://www.fantasygrounds.com/reports/2020Q4/

On Roll20 5e is over 50% (but the data is 1 quarter behind)
https://blog.roll20.net/posts/the-orr-group-industry-report-q3-2020-breakout/
« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 05:17:11 PM by robh »