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Author Topic: PC Games Every Roleplayer MUST own.  (Read 58603 times)

Maddman

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« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2006, 01:42:45 PM »
While I agree more fantasy games are needed (especially half-life), you can't avoid mentioning World of Warcraft.  The number of people that play are staggering, and it is a very fun and well designed game.
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UmaSama

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« Reply #31 on: October 19, 2006, 06:24:34 PM »
The truth is that I've barely played WoW at all, so I feel Im in no position to make a review of it.
Anyway this week I'm overly busy with school, I got to deliver a Shell Script for next week, and the next monday after that I got to deliver the database for the library, and a program compiled in C, so dont expect to see a new review for the next few days.

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Great action game + rpg elements = Deus Ex.
« Reply #32 on: November 14, 2006, 11:02:34 PM »
One of my all time favourites, I loved the skill advancement system wich allowed me to personalize JC (nanoenhanced super-agent protagonist of the game)the way I wanted, meaning that despise having to use the same protagonist every time I played the game I was able to use several different characters based on their skills.
Good Story, great environment, great graphics, good sound.
Not to short nor long, just the right lenght for this game, when I finished it I didn't felt like the game needed to be shorter nor longer.
I really loved the option of changing the course of the game based on the descitions I made in some points of the game such as the final when based upon my choice I was able to see three different finals for the game.
Really one of the best games I've played so far, remember the days when I played it makes me wish there were a new version of this classic besides Deus ex Invisible War.

Some pics:





Here's the site of the game if any of you want to know more.

Scoundrel

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« Reply #33 on: October 07, 2007, 02:41:53 AM »
Was I the only one who thought that Planescape: Torment was utter crap?
 

riprock

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« Reply #34 on: October 07, 2007, 03:36:01 AM »
Quote from: Scoundrel
Was I the only one who thought that Planescape: Torment was utter crap?


I was never able to get interested in P:T.  

Deus Ex, on the other hand, I found addictive even when I couldn't master it.

The original Fallout was IMHO much better than Fallout 2.
"By their way of thinking, gold and experience goes[sic] much further when divided by one. Such shortsighted individuals are quick to stab their fellow players in the back if they think it puts them ahead. They see the game solely as a contest between themselves and their fellow players.  How sad.  Clearly the game is a contest between the players and the GM.  Any contest against your fellow party members is secondary." Hackmaster Player's Handbook

GrimJesta

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« Reply #35 on: October 08, 2007, 05:56:54 PM »
Deus Ex is one of the best games ever made, hands down. I still play it to this day and still discover new crap in the plot or in the world itself. It's a cyberpunk fan's wet dream. And the plot is amazing.

[/gush mode]

Deus Ex 2 sucked rooster testes. I haven't been that disappointed since the 2004 POTUS election results came in.

I wonder when Arcanum is going to make the list, eh?

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JongWK

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« Reply #36 on: October 10, 2007, 09:57:36 AM »
Europa Universalis 3.. utterly addictive.
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Tyberious Funk

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« Reply #37 on: December 20, 2007, 01:25:40 AM »
Quote from: Scoundrel
Was I the only one who thought that Planescape: Torment was utter crap?


Probably not.  It was an utter flop in terms of sales.

Which was a shame really... it was the most rockin' game EVAH!
 

Lancer

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« Reply #38 on: March 19, 2008, 08:52:56 PM »
Quote from: Tyberious Funk
Probably not.  It was an utter flop in terms of sales.

Which was a shame really... it was the most rockin' game EVAH!


It was an utter flop not because people didn't like it.. Rather, it was marketed so poorly that it didn't have a chance.
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J Arcane

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« Reply #39 on: March 22, 2008, 01:07:12 AM »
Quote from: Lancer
It was an utter flop not because people didn't like it.. Rather, it was marketed so poorly that it didn't have a chance.
OR maybe because the US isn't a good target market for a visual novel . . .
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Melan

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« Reply #40 on: March 22, 2008, 08:13:42 AM »
I disagree with the opening post. I have a very low opinion on Baldur's Gate, and would never consider it the king of PC RPGs. I will concede that the world of the Forgotten Realms isn't a turnoff for other people, so I will leave that angle alone... only noting that the story is pretty weak with nothing particularly outstanding. My bigger criticism is that BG doesn't play all that well.

The real time but pausable combat lacked the interesting tactical possibilities of D&D that we got in pure, distilled form in the Gold Box games like Secret of the Silver Blades or Curse of the Azure Bonds. You never had enough control over your dudes or the battle situation. I don't mean that they occasionally got scared and ran (I loved that kind of thing in Jagged Alliance 2), it is that the interface was clumsy and awkward and there weren't enough interesting things to do.

The game process was remarkably dull. The exploration of world areas strip by strip made the experience rather monotonous. Older CRPGs had the challenge of mapping a convoluted wilderness and dungeons on graph paper (a bit of a lost art today); in Ultima VII, you faced navigation challenges and the space of the overland was filled with interesting little details, unique locations, hidden dungeons and NPCs. In comparison, Baldur's Gate gives us wide open areas, but they don't have so much of interest, and again, you just "strip them". The gnoll fortress was the only area I remember as entertaining (and I think some good stuff was also found in Cloakwood).

Baldur's Gate was also full of dull fetch quests. I am not totally against them if they are done smartly, but here, they were very repetitive. Again, Ultima VII. had tasks ranging from fetch through investigation to discovering some mundane, plot-irrelevant but interesting details (like how the high and mighty Lord British is screwing the chambermaid ;) ). Fallout also had involving, not over-complicated but complex quests. BG, in comparison, is as complex as a lump of coal.

Annoying sound acting. "You must gather your party before venturing forth." <Shudder> Professional but soulless graphics.

All in all, I consider BG firmly mediocre. It is not a bad game (the multi-CD interactive movies of the mid 1990s are much more offensive); rather, it is the triumph of average design. I was entertained for a short while, and slogged through the rest of it because if I had already spent (a lot of) money on it, I might as well get something back. I didn't get much, and sold it soon afterwards. :what:

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« Reply #41 on: March 22, 2008, 08:57:50 AM »
Quote from: JongWK
Europa Universalis 3.. utterly addictive.
I played one of the EU games and while it seemed a well made strategy game...

I was absolutely swamped trying to learn it (no fucking manual!)
 

Lancer

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« Reply #42 on: March 22, 2008, 11:08:41 AM »
Quote from: Melan
I disagree with the opening post. I have a very low opinion on Baldur's Gate, and would never consider it the king of PC RPGs. I will concede that the world of the Forgotten Realms isn't a turnoff for other people, so I will leave that angle alone... only noting that the story is pretty weak with nothing particularly outstanding. My bigger criticism is that BG doesn't play all that well.

The real time but pausable combat lacked the interesting tactical possibilities of D&D that we got in pure, distilled form in the Gold Box games like Secret of the Silver Blades or Curse of the Azure Bonds. You never had enough control over your dudes or the battle situation. I don't mean that they occasionally got scared and ran (I loved that kind of thing in Jagged Alliance 2), it is that the interface was clumsy and awkward and there weren't enough interesting things to do.

The game process was remarkably dull. The exploration of world areas strip by strip made the experience rather monotonous. Older CRPGs had the challenge of mapping a convoluted wilderness and dungeons on graph paper (a bit of a lost art today); in Ultima VII, you faced navigation challenges and the space of the overland was filled with interesting little details, unique locations, hidden dungeons and NPCs. In comparison, Baldur's Gate gives us wide open areas, but they don't have so much of interest, and again, you just "strip them". The gnoll fortress was the only area I remember as entertaining (and I think some good stuff was also found in Cloakwood).

Baldur's Gate was also full of dull fetch quests. I am not totally against them if they are done smartly, but here, they were very repetitive. Again, Ultima VII. had tasks ranging from fetch through investigation to discovering some mundane, plot-irrelevant but interesting details (like how the high and mighty Lord British is screwing the chambermaid ;) ). Fallout also had involving, not over-complicated but complex quests. BG, in comparison, is as complex as a lump of coal.

Annoying sound acting. "You must gather your party before venturing forth." <Shudder> Professional but soulless graphics.

All in all, I consider BG firmly mediocre. It is not a bad game (the multi-CD interactive movies of the mid 1990s are much more offensive); rather, it is the triumph of average design. I was entertained for a short while, and slogged through the rest of it because if I had already spent (a lot of) money on it, I might as well get something back. I didn't get much, and sold it soon afterwards. :what:

I've known of someone who played Ultima VII first before playing BG1 and had a similar assessment to you regarding BG1.

Oddly, I enjoy both games tremendously.. Even though I played BG1 first.
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JongWK

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« Reply #43 on: March 22, 2008, 12:51:24 PM »
Quote from: signoftheserpent
I played one of the EU games and while it seemed a well made strategy game...

I was absolutely swamped trying to learn it (no fucking manual!)



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Narf the Mouse

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« Reply #44 on: October 21, 2008, 06:18:33 AM »
...Five pages and no-one's mentioned Daggerfall or Morrowind??
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