This is a site for discussing roleplaying games. Have fun doing so, but there is one major rule: do not discuss political issues that aren't directly and uniquely related to the subject of the thread and about gaming. While this site is dedicated to free speech, the following will not be tolerated: devolving a thread into unrelated political discussion, sockpuppeting (using multiple and/or bogus accounts), disrupting topics without contributing to them, and posting images that could get someone fired in the workplace (an external link is OK, but clearly mark it as Not Safe For Work, or NSFW). If you receive a warning, please take it seriously and either move on to another topic or steer the discussion back to its original RPG-related theme.
NOTICE: Some online security services are reporting that information for a limited number of users from this site is for sale on the "dark web." As of right now, there is no direct evidence of this, but change your password just to be safe.

Author Topic: Translating for RPGs  (Read 1181 times)

ronwisegamgee

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 30
Translating for RPGs
« on: July 17, 2017, 12:40:15 AM »
Greetings, folks. I was wondering how to go about translating for game designers of RPGs, specifically English to Spanish. Are the words per cent ratios similar to those of freelance writers? For now, I'm simply reaching out to game designers to see if they would like their rule books translated in Spanish to help expand their customer base.

I'm mainly curious as to how to go about negotiating payment terms so that I get paid upon the delivery and approval of a product and how to help prevent being shafted by a client, such as being told that my work is not up to standard and am thus not paid but then the translated product is put up for sale regardless.

Lynn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1889
Translating for RPGs
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2017, 02:48:34 PM »
Quote from: ronwisegamgee;976109
Greetings, folks. I was wondering how to go about translating for game designers of RPGs, specifically English to Spanish. Are the words per cent ratios similar to those of freelance writers? For now, I'm simply reaching out to game designers to see if they would like their rule books translated in Spanish to help expand their customer base.

I'm mainly curious as to how to go about negotiating payment terms so that I get paid upon the delivery and approval of a product and how to help prevent being shafted by a client, such as being told that my work is not up to standard and am thus not paid but then the translated product is put up for sale regardless.

In 'traditional' translation, it is usually done on a 'per word' basis. I think the biggest challenge outside of large scale distribution RPGs, is there being enough $$$ in anyone's budget to pay for a translation, especially considering how low expectations are for authorship.
Lynn Fredricks
Entrepreneurial Hat Collector

sincerely

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Translating for RPGs
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2017, 06:45:36 PM »
Quote from: Lynn;976226
In 'traditional' translation, it is usually done on a 'per word' basis. I think the biggest challenge outside of large scale distribution RPGs, is there being enough $$$ in anyone's budget to pay for a translation, especially considering how low expectations are for authorship.

Agreed. Unless you're translating for a large company, there's likely not much money to be had in translating TRPGs. That being said, I've personally found translation work to be very educational when it comes to my own language learning, as I'm not a native speaker.

Lynn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1889
Translating for RPGs
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2017, 12:36:20 PM »
Quote from: sincerely;977204
Agreed. Unless you're translating for a large company, there's likely not much money to be had in translating TRPGs. That being said, I've personally found translation work to be very educational when it comes to my own language learning, as I'm not a native speaker.

Ideally you also have someone who will check it to make sure not only is it grammatically correct, but that it makes sense to the target audience.

I have been involved in a lot of localization projects over the last, erg, 25 years. I don't know how many times I have gotten a translation to copyedit and wondered what the heck they are trying to say.
Lynn Fredricks
Entrepreneurial Hat Collector