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Author Topic: Boosting social interaction  (Read 1920 times)

Tod13

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Re: Boosting social interaction
« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2022, 06:52:18 PM »
I will say, though, that having the player actually talk to the GM as if he were the NPC is much more fun and engaging than any possible social minigame.

I was planning to do both!  8)

Zalman

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Re: Boosting social interaction
« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2022, 12:16:03 PM »
The thing is, while combat rules aren't all that realistic, they are compromise because the players cannot possibly replicate combat any other way. Yet social interactions, since it's just talking, can be replicated on the game table. That's why combat rules are needed but social rules are not.

Count me in this camp as well. The argument "what about unsocialized nerds wanting to play smooth-talking orators?" has always felt flat to me. It's like saying, "what if someone who isn't athletic wants to play soccer real good?". If the game we're playing is a tabletop simulation, then sure, let's roll using the "soccer skill". But you don't get to roll or use a mechanic if the game is, you know, soccer.

At some point, we have to decide what skills the game is testing for the players. If player skill isn't involved in a dominant game pillar, then it the players might as well be computer simulations instead of actual people.

To the OP, I'd say, skip the explicit meta-currency as well the deus-ex-machina. Instead, let natural social consequences be the implicit currency. Just make sure it's meaningful and has expressly concrete manifestations.
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Wrath of God

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Re: Boosting social interaction
« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2022, 06:55:22 PM »
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The thing is, while combat rules aren't all that realistic, they are compromise because the players cannot possibly replicate combat any other way. Yet social interactions, since it's just talking, can be replicated on the game table.

Trust me, you cannot replicate believably 18 Cha suave bard, having Cha 6 yourself :P That's the problem.

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I don't see how the GM deciding whether or not the player's argument are convincing is any more arbitrary than the GM deciding that an NPC has a Social Armor Class of 14 and 6 Social Hit Points.

Because one is improvised as it goes, and another pre-planned and objectively standing against player attempts to do something around it.
That does not mean players should not RP. Roll should happen after action is described, not instead of it - and in fact that's how it usually looks in games using social skills.

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Count me in this camp as well. The argument "what about unsocialized nerds wanting to play smooth-talking orators?" has always felt flat to me. It's like saying, "what if someone who isn't athletic wants to play soccer real good?". If the game we're playing is a tabletop simulation, then sure, let's roll using the "soccer skill". But you don't get to roll or use a mechanic if the game is, you know, soccer.

Problem is - RP-ing with your friends is about as related to dunno running hard round of gang negotiations in post-apocalyptic Jacksonville as is playing Football Manager to actual soccer in II league :P
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jhkim

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Re: Boosting social interaction
« Reply #33 on: October 12, 2022, 07:36:33 PM »
The argument "what about unsocialized nerds wanting to play smooth-talking orators?" has always felt flat to me. It's like saying, "what if someone who isn't athletic wants to play soccer real good?". If the game we're playing is a tabletop simulation, then sure, let's roll using the "soccer skill". But you don't get to roll or use a mechanic if the game is, you know, soccer.

At some point, we have to decide what skills the game is testing for the players. If player skill isn't involved in a dominant game pillar, then it the players might as well be computer simulations instead of actual people.

Using social mechanics can still be a test of player skill, just as combat mechanics are a test of player skill. Combat is typically testing player tactical skill in a boardgame/wargame fashion. For example, when I last played Burning Wheel a few years ago, I created my character as an optimized champion in Duel of Wits (the BW social mechanic), and I carefully weighed my options in such duels.

Alternately, social mechanics can serve a similar function to knowledge and technical skills in a mystery. In a mystery, the player is putting together the clues - but they may need skill rolls to collect the right clues and sometimes to interpret or act on the clues.

In social situations, the player is choosing who they are talking to and what they are attempting, but how well they execute might depend on their Charisma and/or appropriate skill rating. They could also get additional information from using skills - like whether they think someone is lying, what that person is looking for, and other information a skilled person might pick up by observing body language, eye movement, and other details that the player doesn't have access to.

VengerSatanis

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Re: Boosting social interaction
« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2022, 08:52:49 AM »
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The thing is, while combat rules aren't all that realistic, they are compromise because the players cannot possibly replicate combat any other way. Yet social interactions, since it's just talking, can be replicated on the game table.

Trust me, you cannot replicate believably 18 Cha suave bard, having Cha 6 yourself :P That's the problem.

What about a player saying, "I use my bard's suave and sophistication to impress and hopefully seduce the bar wench"?

The GM might ask "How?"

And that player could reply with "I use compliments that occasionally seem like they could also be insults... then I get her drunk."


Angry Goblin

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Re: Boosting social interaction
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2022, 04:56:59 AM »
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The thing is, while combat rules aren't all that realistic, they are compromise because the players cannot possibly replicate combat any other way. Yet social interactions, since it's just talking, can be replicated on the game table.

Trust me, you cannot replicate believably 18 Cha suave bard, having Cha 6 yourself :P That's the problem.

What about a player saying, "I use my bard's suave and sophistication to impress and hopefully seduce the bar wench"?

The GM might ask "How?"

And that player could reply with "I use compliments that occasionally seem like they could also be insults... then I get her drunk."

I personally do not allow the players to wave off the interaction and go through with it by mechanics alone, no matter how good their stats are. This makes the interaction easily shallow and might be counterproductive towards your goal of interaction centered gaming, that´s just my two cents though.

Wrath of God

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Re: Boosting social interaction
« Reply #36 on: November 20, 2022, 08:50:45 AM »
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What about a player saying, "I use my bard's suave and sophistication to impress and hopefully seduce the bar wench"?

The GM might ask "How?"

And that player could reply with "I use compliments that occasionally seem like they could also be insults... then I get her drunk."

that's quite fine
strategy can modify roll

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I personally do not allow the players to wave off the interaction and go through with it by mechanics alone, no matter how good their stats are. This makes the interaction easily shallow and might be counterproductive towards your goal of interaction centered gaming, that´s just my two cents though.

But this is middle ground for someone who would, and possible GM cringed terribly at actually playing flirt.
Treat interaction like combat/exploration - chosen tactics influences difficulty.
"Never compromise. Not even in the face of Armageddon.”

"And I will strike down upon thee
With great vengeance and furious anger"


"Molti Nemici, Molto Onore"