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Author Topic: Tribulation game, rounding out the style  (Read 377 times)

rway218

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« on: September 20, 2012, 02:04:03 pm »
I have a d8 mechanics game, that is based on the christian theory of an extended end times; with a period of tribulation, that has people left behind fighting for God.  The system has simplified magic, down to a single word and a target roll, and quick combat all based on a 1d8 roll.

Basic mechanics:
all attributes and abilities are scored 1 - 7
roll 1d8 to do a "check" with 1 always a success and 8 always a fail
Combat works on 1 - 8 initiative (low to high)
To hit you use your fighting skill level (1 - 7) no speed factors for weapons
All characters have a base attack, plus extra attacks per skills or weapon used
Successive attacks are done at the end of combat round, following the previous initiative score
all characters get a repel check when attacked for no or modified damage

Character creation:
Based on set character build points by class
No extra points can be "bought"
Each section of the character sheet has a set cost for character development (class modifiers are written in the rules)
After creation, any leftover points are converted to experience for use later
Characters grow by buying more abilities or raising scores with XP (level-less system)

World is set up as a combination of super hero style, and dungeon crawl adventure; allowing the players to be on the good or evil side.  

I tried to put it all simply, but if it's too simple let me know.  

What i'm looking for are thoughts on the system itself.  Would the 1d8 be too restrictive, are level less systems even wanted in today's market, and would that setting be something you are interested in playing?

Catelf

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2012, 02:47:46 pm »
Quote from: rway218;584051
What i'm looking for are thoughts on the system itself.  Would the 1d8 be too restrictive, are level less systems even wanted in today's market, and would that setting be something you are interested in playing?

The system ....
My experience with critics and helpfuls over at other sites, mainly the Forge, has made me realize that several systems may work in the same situation.
There is one pice of info i need to know about this system too, though, and that is: How is Damage calculated?

I see nothing wrong with the current idea for the system, though, much because i like simple game systems that still leaves space for detailing.

I also find level-less systems better than levels, but that is also a matter of taste.

As for the setting .... I'm personally not very fond of it, really, but it may still be interesting.
However, the "World is set up as a combination of super hero style, and dungeon crawl adventure; allowing the players to be on the good or evil side." feels both really interesting in the SuperHero/DungeounCrawl - mix, and disturbing in the possibility to play "on the evil side".
Mainly due to the fact, that people very rarely considers themselves to "do evil things", they usually rationalize it, thinking they are doing good, rather.
And i do think they would still do so, even while facing an extended "end times".
But, this is when worldviews and game's worldviews collides.

When it comes to putting religous things into games, it seems often easier to disguise it as something else ...
I may not dislike D&D any longer, but I still dislike the Chaos-Lawful/Evil-Good alignment system, as well as the level system.
;)
________________________________________

Link to my wip Ferals 0.8 unfinished but playable on pdf on MediaFire for free download here :
https://www.mediafire.com/?0bwq41g438u939q

TristramEvans

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2012, 03:59:48 pm »
Quote from: rway218;584051
I have a d8 mechanics game, that is based on the christian theory of an extended end times; with a period of tribulation, that has people left behind fighting for God.


Why does God need people to fight for him and what are they fighting? (I don't know much about the whole "Left Behind" thing.


Quote

  The system has simplified magic, down to a single word and a target roll, and quick combat all based on a 1d8 roll.

Basic mechanics:
all attributes and abilities are scored 1 - 7
roll 1d8 to do a "check" with 1 always a success and 8 always a fail
Combat works on 1 - 8 initiative (low to high)
To hit you use your fighting skill level (1 - 7) no speed factors for weapons
All characters have a base attack, plus extra attacks per skills or weapon used
Successive attacks are done at the end of combat round, following the previous initiative score
all characters get a repel check when attacked for no or modified damage


Seems workable enough. Are the players fighting demons during the apocalypse?

Quote
Character creation:
Based on set character build points by class
No extra points can be "bought"
Each section of the character sheet has a set cost for character development (class modifiers are written in the rules)
After creation, any leftover points are converted to experience for use later
Characters grow by buying more abilities or raising scores with XP (level-less system)


So each class has a different total of points? Why not give every player the same amount of points and have class determined by where the players put the points?

Quote
World is set up as a combination of super hero style, and dungeon crawl adventure; allowing the players to be on the good or evil side.


Is it player vs player, or is "allowed to be on either side" a group decision before the game begins? What are the goals in the game for evil players? Are they playing Satanists or Demons?   What are the "dungeons" in the setting? Hell?

Quote
What i'm looking for are thoughts on the system itself.  Would the 1d8 be too restrictive, are level less systems even wanted in today's market, and would that setting be something you are interested in playing?


I don't usually play games with levels at all these days, and I assume that the majority of people not playing D&d or PF mostly play level/class-less games.
Can you elaborate on the combat mechanics? How are wounds handled?

I don't think it's too restrictive for a very focused game, but it's not the type of system that would sell, me, personally on the game, if it wasn't combined with a setting I was very interested in. Can you elaborate on the setting? If the game is ostensibly about Christians left on earth by God (after the apocalypse I'm assuming?), why have the option of players as evil characters? What is the endgoal of players in the setting? Are they like the priests in The Omen series devoted to hunting down the antichrist and his minions? Do any aspects of the book of Revelations come up in game? Are there going to be the Four Horsemen roaming the Earth? Do angels intervene? For that matter, since God has his heavenly host of warriors, why would he "enlist" humans to "fight" in the apocalypse (which God assumedly was the one who kicked off?) How does this setting differ from scripture and common interpretations (besides of course the Book of Revelations referring to the fall of Rome and not an actual End of the World scenario)? How does magic play into the setting, or different denominations?
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rway218

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2012, 06:52:02 pm »
Quote from: TristramEvans;589022
Why does God need people to fight for him and what are they fighting? (I don't know much about the whole "Left Behind" thing.


According to most premillennialists (aka those who view the book of revelation as future) God leaves the earth to the antichrist, and anyone left behind will have to fight to resist him, or be destroyed when Christ returns for his thousand year reign.  I took that idea and said the same thing, "what would be worth fighting?"  In this game you are mostly set out to gather a resistance force, and try to destroy the antichrist on earth.  So, the players would be surviving the rise of the antichrist, and recruiting people, then trying to destroy his armies.


Quote from: TristramEvans;589022
Seems workable enough. Are the players fighting demons during the apocalypse?


I have written six types of demons, and several other monsters as basic encounters.  Some are NPC style spies or  United World Police Officers.  It all takes place after the "Godly" have been taken from the earth, but there was no apocalypse as some would see it, just a world leader who takes charge of every country without conflict.  (The white horse in rev. as some would say)

Quote from: TristramEvans;589022
So each class has a different total of points? Why not give every player the same amount of points and have class determined by where the players put the points?


I didn't actually try that approach.  What I did was come up with a base number needed to make an average character, then gave some class bonuses for special features they needed to be used successfully.  I also gave them higher restriction in play to try and balance their power.  I'm still testing generation rules to see how to improve them.

Quote from: TristramEvans;589022
Is it player vs player, or is "allowed to be on either side" a group decision before the game begins? What are the goals in the game for evil players? Are they playing Satanists or Demons?   What are the "dungeons" in the setting? Hell?


What I mean by "playing either side" is characters can be made with evil outlooks (alignments).  I didn't want to restrict game play via a rules set to only good -vs- evil, with all good characters.  It is open to where you can create demon characters and, as a group, take the other side (not that I would).  The goal of an evil group would be to hunt down the good guys (to be simple about it).  The dungeon crawl aspect lies in the fact that it is set in the modern world, and we have so many sewers, underground military bases, cave systems, and subways that you could make use of them as a GM.  

Quote from: TristramEvans;589022
I don't usually play games with levels at all these days, and I assume that the majority of people not playing D&d or PF mostly play level/class-less games.
Can you elaborate on the combat mechanics? How are wounds handled?


If attacked, each successful hit will cause damage to your body.  When you reach zero, you are dead (or see chapter one character creation).  Once the character is down to one damage point, they can no longer fight, and are considered knocked out.  If they are healed at any point they will be able to return to a fight in one round (see The Rules of Combat later).  
   To calculate body damage at creation, look at your strength and reflex score costs.  Take the full value of the actual level the character has (A 2 Strength is worth 4 points and a 3 Reflex is worth 8 points).  Now add the values together for your base score, say a 12.  Because this will be a low number at creation, all characters get a 1d8 bonus roll.  So add the roll number to the base and get your Body Damage.
 EXAMPLE:  You have a base of 12, and roll an 8 bonus.  This will give you a 20 Body Damage.
   After creation, when you raise your strength and reflex, you will add only what you spent in Experience Points to your total.  
EXAMPLE:  You raise your 2 Strength to a 3.  This will add 8 points to your Body Damage for a score of 28.
   Once you reach the maximum 7 in both attributes, you will reach your maximum Body Damage score of 516 (assuming you rolled an 8 for your Body Damage Bonus).  No PC or NPC can have more than this maximum score.

Weapons have a set damage.  exampe: Claymore  Damage Value 13.  Add your strength score to a melee weapon for full damage  (strength of five would give you 18 damage per successful hit)

The characters have a repel roll to use (at their option) to deflect an attack.  If that roll fails, body armor can stop the character from taking damage (it has a point value ex:  24 point armor vest will absorb an 18 point blow, but will be reduced to a 6 point vest until repaired).

Bladed and blunt attacks will cause bleeding damage.  This must be stopped with first-aid after a battle, or with "combat healing" skill durring battle.  So a character can bleed out if they take too much damage.

Quote from: TristramEvans;589022
I don't think it's too restrictive for a very focused game, but it's not the type of system that would sell, me, personally on the game, if it wasn't combined with a setting I was very interested in. Can you elaborate on the setting? If the game is ostensibly about Christians left on earth by God (after the apocalypse I'm assuming?), why have the option of players as evil characters? What is the endgoal of players in the setting? Are they like the priests in The Omen series devoted to hunting down the antichrist and his minions? Do any aspects of the book of Revelations come up in game? Are there going to be the Four Horsemen roaming the Earth? Do angels intervene? For that matter, since God has his heavenly host of warriors, why would he "enlist" humans to "fight" in the apocalypse (which God assumedly was the one who kicked off?) How does this setting differ from scripture and common interpretations (besides of course the Book of Revelations referring to the fall of Rome and not an actual End of the World scenario)? How does magic play into the setting, or different denominations?


They are dedicated to hunting down the antichrist and his minions.  Like the matrix (good movie by the way) you would o into the world and try to free people from his grasp, as one aspect of gaming.  You could always play as demon hunters, or tactical radical factions that attack nwo sites to cause kayos.  I tried not to force any one style of role-play in the game rules.

Magic lives as Godly or Demonic powers.  You can be spell casters of two varieties, and the forces of the antichrist have similar powers to throw right back.

In the game set-up God has abandoned the earth, leaving only a select few to fight for him.  All the faithful (except some asked to stay) are gone, but we are given one last chance to save ourselves.  In the end He may still destroy everything, but we get the chance to change His mind.
Sorry if that sounded preachy, I didn't know how else to put it.

Thanks for the comments so far!

rway218

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2012, 06:56:15 pm »
Quote from: Catelf;588999
The system ....
My experience with critics and helpfuls over at other sites, mainly the Forge, has made me realize that several systems may work in the same situation.
There is one pice of info i need to know about this system too, though, and that is: How is Damage calculated?


Depending on the weapon.  If it is melee, you have a base damage added to character strength.  Missile weapons have a set total damage.  Each can be modified with a repel check (like a dodge or parry) or absorbed with armor.  I set more detail in the previous answer.

Hope this helps!

Bloody Stupid Johnson

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2012, 06:31:50 pm »
It sounds fairly workable.
d8 systems are fairly rare, but there's nothing inherently wrong with them - just that d10s and d6s are more popular due to (I think) 10% increments and the popularity of Storyteller, and availability of d6s respectively.

A couple of questions
*how are you handling skills? I get the impression skills are purchased separately, do attributes modify skill checks at all?  Can a character Fight unless they put a point into Fight, for instance? Are certain skills received for free?

*the hit point system (using base purchase cost) is interesting. How many points are needed to buy each level of body? Is this fixed or does it go up each time?

rway218

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2012, 08:41:06 am »
Quote from: Bloody Stupid Johnson;590146

A couple of questions
*how are you handling skills? I get the impression skills are purchased separately, do attributes modify skill checks at all?  Can a character Fight unless they put a point into Fight, for instance? Are certain skills received for free?


I have fighting skills to make unarmed combat more effective, and standard weapon skills (as in sword or pistol) to use respectively.  They are purchased separately at a non progressive cost, but are not modified by attributes.  I have all skill checks raise as the skill roll raises (or hobbies if you take them).  There are also rules for unskilled combat, using strike rolls for hand to hand or unskilled weapons, in the GM section.

Quote from: Bloody Stupid Johnson;590146
*the hit point system (using base purchase cost) is interesting. How many points are needed to buy each level of body? Is this fixed or does it go up each time?


It doubles as you buy.  1 point for level one, then 2, 4, 8, 16 and so on.  That way you get a good value for the experience you spend on them later.  If you would like a copy of the core system PM me your email and I'll get one out to you.  

That can be said for anyone who would like the rough draft.  It's without art, and not in final format, but has about everything else.

Bloody Stupid Johnson

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Tribulation game, rounding out the style
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2012, 04:58:02 pm »
Hmm...doubling cost each time means that 'hit points' seem to increase fairly drastically compared to damage at the top (e.g. from 6 to 7 Str, you get only +1 damage, but an extra 32 HPs ?). Starting characters need armour for the extra body points, while the advanced characters have tonnes of them (much like a high level D&D character).
 
Anyway will send through my email, happy to take a look.